demographics of Chinese Christians; ministries going beyond Chinese

To: cac@emwave.net

——————————

From: “GE Liang”
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 1997 10:51:52 -0700
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Affirmative Action

CACers,

>But, if there are bright ideas that folks have or have come
>across, why not share them or point us to objective forums where they are
>being aired?

Here are a few interesting locations on the WWW re: AA:
http://humanitas.ucsb.edu/projects/aa/aa.html
http://www.netdoor.com/com/rronline/reconciler/spr96/aadebate.html
http://www.netdoor.com/com/rronline/tb21feb96.html

Here’s a late tidbit re: Thanksgiving from the BIBLE list at UVA:
– —

My local newspaper reprinted the following in today¹s issue. It is too powerful not
to pass it on. Perhaps a reading of it around your tables tomorrow would
be appropriate.

Happy a blessed and thankful Thanksgiving everyone!

Abraham Lincoln¹s 1863 Thanksgiving Proclamation:

³It is the duty of nations as well as of men to own their dependence upon
the overruling power of God; to confess their sins and transgressions in
humble sorrow, yet, with assured hope that genuine repentance will lead to
mercy and pardon; and to recognize the sublime truth, announced in the Holy
Scripture and proven by all history, that those nations are blessed whose
God is the Lord.
³We know that by His divine law, nations, like individuals, are subjected
to punishments and chastisements in this world. May we not justly fear that
the awful calamity of civil war which now desolates the land may be a punishment

inflicted upon us for our presumptuous sins, to the needful end of our national
reformation as a whole people?
³We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of heaven; we have
been preserved these many years in peace and prosperity; we have grown in
numbers, wealth and power as no other nation has ever grown.
³But we have forgotten God.
³We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace and multiplied
and enriched and strengthened us, and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness

of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom
and virtue of our own.
³Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to
feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to
the God that made us.
³It has seemed to me fit and proper that God should be solemnly, reverently
and gratefully acknowledged, as with one heart and one voice, by the whole
American people. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of
the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning
in foreign lands, to set apart the observe the last Thursday of November
as a day of Thanksgiving and praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth
in the heavens.
²A. Lincoln
October 3, 1863

Dave Cook
Scripture Song Source
http://place2b.org/scrpsngsrc/

——————————

From: “DJ Chuang”
Date: Mon, 1 Dec 1997 20:34:15 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: about CAC

FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about CAC

Updated: 1 Dec 97

[This is a monthly posting; * marks What’s New]

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Q: What is this CAC mailing list?

A: The CAC Forum is an informal “mailing list” online discussion for
Chinese American Christians, where we discuss many issues related to
(but not limited to) Chinese American Christians, including campus
ministry and ethnic church issues, as well as some political issues
concerning Asian Americans. As an informal forum, you may also share
ministry opportunities and prayer requests accordingly.

Q: What does CAC stand for?

A: CAC is Chinese American Christians. Although the scope of discussions
often discuss Asian American issues and sometimes generic topics, the
name stuck because of its origin.

Q: How many subscribers are there on CAC?

A: Currently we have more than 180 ministry leaders and laypersons.
Please forward this message to others who may be interested in the CAC
forum.

Q: How does a “mailing list” work?

A: CAC is run by an automated computer program, called a “listserver”,
which send copies of email messages to all CAC subscribers. Currently
the listserver is undergoing some technical transition, but that should
be transparent to you.

Q: When was CAC started and automated?

A: The list was started in 1995 by Drs. Timothy Tseng and Sze-Kar Wan.
CAC used to be a manually propagated carbon copy email, but was
automated in summer of 1996. We hope to bring Chinese American
Christians together using the latest technology so that we can share our
ideas and resources on furthering the cause of the Christ.

Q: Is there a moderator for CAC?

A: DJ Chuang is the list manager; there is no
moderator for the ongoing discussions.

– —
*

——————————

From: TSTseng@aol.com
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 1997 02:39:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Bill Lann Lee

Stephen:

I appreciate your thoughts about both the Bill Lann Lee nomination and
Affirmative Action – they are among the most perceptive and considerate ones
I’ve seen on this list.

Associating the current stalled hearings to anti-Asian sentiment is a bit
overstated, though it wouldn’t be fair to dismiss its existence either. (So
far as I can tell, no one on this CAC list has attributed this development to
anti-Asian sentiment.) Certainly other issues must be factored in, but I’m
rather suspicious of those who play the “qualification” card (who wouldn’t be
after a good look at the “quality” of political leaders we have from both
parties). This is really more a partisan fight between constituencies that
support the two parties rather than over how America defines civil rights.
In other words, why do unions, civil rights organizations, feminists, and
environmentalists gravitate towards the Democratic Party despite their
unhappiness with the party’s shift to the right? Why do groups like the
Christian Coalition, big businesses, etc. ally themselves with the Republican
Party despite their unhappiness with the party’s apparent willingness to
compromise with Democrats? Who’s interests are served by the Hatch’s
willingess to make such an issue of the Lee nomination? (Remember the Lani
Guinier nomination? Republicans blocked her nomination, too. She was the
first Democrat to be “Borked” – and apparently, not the last) I think that
when these “why” questions are answered, we begin to get at the heart of the
debate. After all, politics is the art of the possible, the skilled
maneuvering between or response to various interest groups with power. Thus,
IMHO, the responsible Christian citizen needs to discern carefully and with
great scrutiny the difference between ideological rhetoric and consequential
actions (actually, actions speak louder than words in politics). Which
interest groups are we supporting when we vote or take certain positions on
issues?

Again, thanks for your thoughtful comments and God bless. – Tim

In a message dated 12/1/97 3:52:28 AM, SKYLeung@aol.com wrote:

<>

– ————————————————————
Rev. Dr. Timothy Tseng
Sallie Knowles Crozer Assistant Professor of American Religious History
Colgate-Rochester Divinity School
1100 South Goodman Street
Rochester, NY 14620
OFF: (716) 271-1320, ext. 260
FAX: (716) 271-8013
Email: tstseng@aol.com

——————————

From: TSTseng@aol.com
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 1997 02:57:20 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Re: CAC_Mail: Do we Asian-American owe anything???

Harry:

Thanks so much for your thoughtful comments! It puts so much into
perspective.

It seems to me that your experiences have led you to accept an either/or
solutions for the “race” problem in America: either individual self-help or
social responsibility (ensured by gov’t). With the exception of the cultural
pathology and the Asian American model theses, I agree with all your
perscriptions for African Americans. Education, hard work, familial
fidelity, discipline, etc. are all part of the solution, but do not
constitute the whole answer.

The “liberal” analysis of American society is also valid – people of color do
have the odds stacked against them (BTW, who said anything about socialism?).

In a message dated 12/1/97 2:13:40 AM, HarryWLew@aol.com wrote:

<>

——————————

From: TSTseng@aol.com
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 1997 02:58:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Re: CAC_Mail: Do we Asian-American owe anything???

Apologies, I accidently sent an incomplete message – will send the final
draft later. – Tim

——————————

From: Sze-kar Wan
Date: Tue, 02 Dec 1997 12:37:07 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: A CAC perspective on AA?

Dear CACers:

Deadlines abound and I am in deep water with my publishers. I suspect
my activities on CAC will be greatly curtailed in the coming months.
Before I fade away, however, an explanatory summary might be in order.

Our recent discussion on AA has been dominated too much by the kind of
partisan arguments we read and hear in the media. Not a problem in
itself, but I would once again exhort all of us to return to what the
CAC formum is all about: only two criteria truly count in my
thinking–so far as CAC is concerned–our Asian-American identity and
our Christian faith.

Notwithstanding recent accusations against me, I do not espouse
Democratic party lines. In fact, I find BOTH political parties
particularly unapetitizing. Even given all my misgivings with Promise
Keepers, their Washington rally brought to sharp relief the promise
BREAKERS that infest our capital today. I likewise find the extremists
on both sides of the theological spectrum troubling (see my post “Re:
Dislodging our churches from the Religious Right,” 11/6/97). I have
attempted time and again to steer our discussion to an Asian-American
perspective on aff. action (see my posts, “What is the issue?” 11/18/97
and “Re: What is the issue?” 11/20/97)–apparently without much success.

Again, notwhithstanding such labels of my views as “blantant heresy” or
“quasi-Christian,” I steadfastly maintain my Christian perspective. In
the last court of appeal, it’s the only one that counts. If there be
disagreement (and there is always disagreement; it’s a given; it’s what
it means to be in a body with diverse parts), I hope we could agree it’s
just a matter of different readings of the Bible and not a cause for
damning the other side. To raise questions of someone else’s faith on
the basis of disagreement is character-assassination. It’s
mafia-tactic; it has no place in the Christian body.

(1) An Asian-American perspective on Affirmative Action: I can
understand why AsiAm are ambivalent about AA. On the one hand, AsiAm
have benefited from AA. Part of our sucsess is due in part to
enlightened policies won as a result of the civil rights movt in the
60s. Clarenence is right in this regard. If AA hadn’t been enforced,
for example, I probably wouldn’t even have a chance at a college
education–no matter how hard I worked. In a country like Germany, say,
a 15-yr-old immigrant with no language skill would be destined for a
life of menial jobs–no matter how hard he works. In my early years in
this country, it was precisely BECAUSE I knew I had a chance to go to
college that I applied myself in a way I had never before. Tim is
right: AA does not preclude hard work but gives our hard work something
to show for and may even encourage it.

On the other hand, AA in its present incarnation does not seem to
benefit AsiAm. In the academic field, my African-American and women
colleagues have more offers than they can say “no” to. In terms of
qualifications, I am at least as “qualified” as they are, yet I have
nary the same opportunities. In fellowship applications, AsiAm are
official “non-minorities,” so that we have to compete with whites.
Similar examples can be multiplied. UC Berkeley and Boston Latin
readily come to mind.

The issues are, of course, vastly more complicated than this, and I
don’t presume to understand all the legal subtleties. My point here is
simply that intelligent AsiAm can disagree on AA.

(2) A Biblical Perspective on Affirmative Action: What persuades me to
argue for retaining SOME FORM of AA, however, is the biblical mandate
for economic justice. In a post (“Re: Bill Lee” 11/19/97), I listed a
number of bibical texts: Acts 2.43-47; 4.32-37; Luke 4.18-19; Amos
4.1-3; Isa 58. I should also add 2 Cor 8.13-15, where Paul talks of
economic equality and the Christian willingness to give what one has to
those who do not. He cites Exodus 16.18 (in v. 15) and sets forth Jesus
as an examplar: “For you know the grace of our Lord, Jesus Christ, that
he, though rich, became poor on our behalf, in order that you yourselves
might become rich by his poverty” (2 Cor 8.9). While the spiritual
dimension is clearly there–it’s about Christ’s incarnation after
all–Paul is using it in a direct appeal to the Corinthian Christians
sharing their wealth with the poor in Jerusalem (2 Cor 8.1-15; cf. Gal
2.10). This is an economic appropriation of the incarnation , if you
will. The spiritual and the material are never separated in Paul’s view.

Whether the quota system or set-asides are the best way to implement
this vision, I defer to lawyers and legal experts on CAC who know far
more than I. But SOME FORM of balancing the playing field ought to be
in place. It’s the biblical thing to do.

It’s been exasperating but also rewarding.

Blessings and sober reflection on the central mystery of our faith–of
triumph accomplished through defeat, of life through death, of power in
weakness, of the Lord of the universe, Master of time and space, taking
on the despised, helpless, slimy, barely-human body of a newborn infant.

Sze-kar Wan

——————————

From: gdot@juno.com (G Ottoson)
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 1997 18:38:20 -0700
Subject: CAC_Mail: Comment

“Raise your glass to the hard working people
Lets drink to the uncounted heads
Lets think of the wandering millions
Who need leaders but get gamblers instead”
–Mick Jagger / Keith Richards

Sze-kar, Maybe Promise Keepers (vs. “promise BREAKERS”) are more
counter-cultural than I thought 🙂

G

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Tue, 02 Dec 1997 22:50:49 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: A CAC perspective on AA?

Thank you, brother Sze-kar, for your well-measured, well-balanced (IMHO)
summation on AA. I, for one, agree with everything you laid out. Amen.

ken fong.

——————————

From: TSTseng@aol.com
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 1997 10:07:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject: CAC_Mail: Fwd: AAASCommunity: Book signing, Colloquium, and Reception for Professor Kyeyo

CACers:

FYI, Tim Tseng
– ———————
Forwarded message:
From: dtn@ucla.edu (Don T. Nakanishi)
Sender: owner-aaascommunity@uclink4.berkeley.edu
To: aaascommunity@uclink.berkeley.edu (AAASPOST)
Date: 97-12-03 03:52:40 EST

PLEASE ATTEND A SPECIAL WELCOME BACK RECEPTION, TALK AND BOOK SIGNING —

The Asian American Studies Center cordially invites you to attend a
reception, book signing, and talk by Professor Kyeyoung Park of the UCLA
Anthropology Department and Asian American Studies Center, (and current
Fellow of the Russell Sage Foundation in New York) on

Thursday, December 4, 1997, from 4-6 p.m.,
3232 Campbell Hall (Conference Room, Asian American Studies Center)

Professor Park will be speaking on, “The Korean American Dream: Crafting
Cultures, Identities, and Ideologies.” It will focus on research issues in
connection with her recently published book, The Korean American Dream,
(Cornell University Press, 1997). The talk is part of the Faculty
Colloquium Series of the Center. The event is free and open to the public.

Professor Park will be signing copies of her book during the reception
following her talk.

For further information contact the UCLA Asian American Studies Center,
(310) 825-2974.

Don T. Nakanishi, Director and Professor
UCLA Asian American Studies Center
3230 Campbell Hall
PO Box 951546
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546
phone: (310) 825-2974
fax: (310) 206-9844
e-mail: dtn@ucla.edu
Center’s web site: http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/aasc

================================================================
* AAASCommunity, the Discussion & News list of the
* Email Network of the Association for Asian American Studies
– —————————————————————
* Coordinator:
================================================================

——————————

From: HarryWLew@aol.com
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 1997 16:57:45 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Re: CAC_Mail: Do we Asian-American owe anything???

Dear Clarence and CACers,

Oops. I misspelt Nicholas Lemann’s last name in my last post. Coming from New
York City, I always want to insert an “h” in it. Thanks Peter for pointing
that out.

So the correct reference is:

Nicholas Lemann’s THE PROMISED LAND: THE GREAT BLACK MIGRATION AND HOW IT
CHANGED AMERICA (Knopf, 1991).

This book is an expansion of a two-article series entitled “The Origins of
the Underclass” that appeared in the June and July 1986 issues of THE
ATLANTIC MONTHLY. It has received much critical acclaim from across the
political spectrum, and has been nominated for and received various awards.

It was the reading of those articles a decade ago that helped revolutionize
my thinking on the issue. It made me realize that the problem of the poor was
not simply an economic one or even a political one. Cultural, individual
spiritual and moral values really matter.

I should have known that as a Christian, but my liberal ideology got in the
way. Christians can really make a difference in the individual lives of folks
trapped in poverty in the innercity.

If you don’t have the time to read the book, you should at least read the
original articles.

Yours in Christ,
Harry Lew

——————————

From: DC Chuang
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 1997 17:53:38 EST
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: Bill Lee and Affirmative Action

In a message dated 97-11-26 05:08:30 EST, you write:

<>

Tim, I find it very hard to believe any true believer could like Mr. Clinton,
though as Christians we are to love the sinner and hate the sin. So to better
phrase it, perhaps I should say Mr. Clinton’s character (or lack thereof).

Regards, DC

p.s. still trying to get around to responding to your last message to me.

——————————

From: SKYLeung@aol.com
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 00:13:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: A CAC perspective

Brother Sze-kar,

You wrote:
>Our recent discussion on AA has been dominated too much by the kind of
>partisan arguments we read and hear in the media. Not a problem in
>itself, but I would once again exhort all of us to return to what the
>CAC formum is all about: only two criteria truly count in my
>thinking–so far as CAC is concerned–our Asian-American identity and
>our Christian faith.
>
>(2) A Biblical Perspective on Affirmative Action: What persuades me to
>argue for retaining SOME FORM of AA, however, is the biblical mandate
>for economic justice…..
>
>Whether the quota system or set-asides are the best way to implement
>this vision, I defer to lawyers and legal experts on CAC who know far
>more than I. But SOME FORM of balancing the playing field ought to be
>in place. It’s the biblical thing to do.

I apologize for bringing in some perspectives that may not be completely
germane to the CAC forum. I also hope that the points I’ve brought up are
not viewed as intentional libel, slander, or defamation. However, I would
like to indulge myself with one more “political” contemplation before getting
back to more “CAC” issues.

I agree that there’s a Biblical mandate for SOME FORM of leveling the playing
field and definitely for economic justice. Moreover, I understand this to be
another Year of Jubilee. But, I simply submit that Affirmative Action as we
know it should not be automatically THE means of “justice” we champion. I
believe some “liberal” thinkers have a point when they ask society to
re-examine concepts of merit. Do AsiAms have strong attachments to
established definitions? Would we be open to rationally revisiting and
possibly revising them? Some elitists may cringe at the thought.

Brother Tim wrote:
:Certainly other issues must be factored in, but I’m
:rather suspicious of those who play the “qualification” card (who wouldn’t
be
:after a good look at the “quality” of political leaders we have from both
:parties). This is really more a partisan fight between constituencies that
:support the two parties rather than over how America defines civil rights.
:In other words, why do unions, civil rights organizations, feminists, and
:environmentalists gravitate towards the Democratic Party despite their
:unhappiness with the party’s shift to the right? Why do groups like the
:Christian Coalition, big businesses, etc. ally themselves with the
Republican
:Party despite their unhappiness with the party’s apparent willingness to
:compromise with Democrats?

I find the question about party affiliation interesting. I believe there is
not one simple answer, or even a simple set of answers. However, I believe
it unfortunately comes down to power alliances and pocketbooks more often
than we’d care to admit. We can’t totally ignore economics. There are even
a few voters that still cast their votes strictly according to fiscal
philosophy. Although, certainly talking out of school here, I believe that
among those focused more on social issues, conservatives tend to be economic
monetarists and liberals tend to be economic activists (although some will be
quick to point out that, despite intervening quite frequently with monetary
measures, Alan Greenspan is supposedly a Reagan Republican). When it comes
to fiscal policies, conservatives tend to take a hands-off, laissez-faire
approach and liberals are more willing to tax and spend. More regulation and
more spending tend to favor causes of those that Brother Tim identified as
aligning themselves with Democrats. As for the Christian Coalition, I
sometimes hear them associate family values with reduced taxes and balanced
budgets.

How do CACers, AsiAms, etc. vote? Do they vote their pocketbooks? Perhaps
socio-economic status and similar factors come into play. I actually believe
reducing taxes before critically and reasonably “pruning” spending is
“gambling” as Brother G might put it. Appropriate and needed Gov. programs
are often crippled by unwise cuts in spending. But, do AsiAms vote against a
backdrop of cultural values that tend to accentuate bottom-line, personal
income, or micro-economic, issues and promises? Is it values, ideas, or the
economy?

Many AsiAms I know went with their pocketbooks in our recent elections here
in Virginia. Eliminating the property tax on cars was the winning campaign
promise. I am tempted to ask, “Does reducing taxes really mean that we as
Christians, or we as AsiAms would give, save, and/or buy more?” To be
honest, I think, working/studying earnestly and getting a higher paying job
would be more probable than realizing substantial income savings from lowered
taxes for most AsiAms.

As a Washingtonian, I’m compelled to let you know that any young techie with
a modicom of skill can make a killing in the DC area these days. There is a
real shortage of programmers around here – check out recent issues of The
Washington Post for more information. Those of you from Silicon Valley or
the Rt. 128 area could send young Christians down this way to EARN more and
GIVE more! They could even check out Brother DJ’s new multi-ethnic church!=)

One last illustration from around here concerning the “enigma” of politics.
On Tuesday, for the first time since home rule began in DC, a Republican was
elected to the City Council. It didn’t matter that he was openly homosexual.
He won primarily on promises of advocating school vouchers! Go figure…

Commenting from (just outside) DC,
Stephen Leung

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Wed, 03 Dec 1997 23:36:40 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: A CAC perspective

Although I certainly am tempted to vote with my pocketbook, I make every
effort to allow my theology to inform my politics. Certainly not a
perfect system by any means, but it’s one attempt to head off my normal
selfish tendencies. Of course, it hinges on how one defines/understands
the kingdom of God, doesn’t it. Ah, I told you this wasn’t perfect. ;-D

ken fong

——————————

From: jtc10@juno.com (J Chang)
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 02:59:12 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: Fwd: Press Release – Internet Online Summit

Dear CACers:

FYI, J. Chang
– ——————-
“PARENTS CAN’T PROTECT KIDS FROM
ON-LINE PORN ALONE – COMPUTER INDUSTRY,
SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES MUST
COOPERATE,” FRC SAYS

WASHINGTON, D.C. – “We are happy to see Internet Service
Providers (ISPs) finally commit to eliminating child
pornography from their services,” Family Research Council
Legal Policy Director Cathy Cleaver said Wednesday after the
Internet Online Summit: Focus on Children. “The American
people will hold them to that commitment. But the industry
must do much more, they must get rid of the other illegal
material they carry: hard-core, clearly ‘obscene’ pornography.”

While early sessions of the Internet Summit had the appearance
of an ISP trade show, protecting children from pornography and
predators was finally addressed. Vice President Gore told
summit attendees that the Clinton administration will
aggressively enforce child porn, child stalking, and obscenity
laws online.

Family Research Council and other leading pro-family groups
called on Attorney General Janet Reno in a full-page ad in
Monday’s Washington Times to enforce obscenity laws
aggressively, especially on the Internet. In her summit
address, Attorney General Reno restated the Department of
Justice’s commitment to enforce child pornography laws on the
Internet, but she failed yet again to address the Department
of Justice’s virtual refusal to enforce violations of current
obscenity laws on-line.

“The Summit spent a considerable amount of its time focusing
on parents’ role in protecting children online and planning
to educate and equip parents for the task, Cleaver said. “The
problem not addressed by the summit is that 70 percent of
children’s Internet access occurs outside of the home where
parents have no control. Parents deserve to know when schools
and libraries are going to decide to be part of the solution.”

“Vice President Gore renewed President Clinton’s promise to
get every school on-line by the year 2000,” Cleaver said.
“That promise may prove disastrous unless education groups
agree to tough filtering software for every school computer.”

A National PTA spokesperson focused on ‘equal access’ to the
Internet for children, but ignored the responsibility of
schools to protect children from the Internet’s dangers.
“Without filtering software on school computers, children may
wind up getting ‘equal access’ to harmful pornographic images,”
Cleaver said. “Schools should be safe havens for children,
not danger zones.”
– ————————————————————–
To unsubscribe from this list, send email to “press@townhall.com”
with the words “Unsubscribe press” in the body of the message.

——————————

From: ohbrudder
Date: Thu, 04 Dec 1997 03:24:28 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: racist

G,

its a closed chapter . . .over 20 years ago. A definite case of:
something they “intended for harm, God intended for good.”
I ended up with a couple of companies and pastoring. It wouldn’t
have happen if I became the VP.

bill

G Ottoson wrote:
>
> On Fri, 28 Nov 1997 10:38:21 -0800 ohbrudder
> writes:
> >
> > I’ll tell you what is objectionable racism. It is when I was passed
> >over for promotion to a vice-president position in favor of a aller,
> > >blonde, blue-eyed white guy who was less qualified than I… admit
> > >I don’t pray for the whites to be saved . . .> >
> > Dear Bill,
> >
> > It is clear from your email context–> the disappointment with MIDDLE
> > MANAGEMENT–> why you might not pray for MANAGEMENT to be
> > ‘saved’…reflecting on it some more I’d ask, were there only white
> > managers involved in ‘passing you over’ for promotion? (e.g. could you
> > have been the first AA/CA VP at the company in question?)
> >
> > G

——————————

From: ohbrudder
Date: Thu, 04 Dec 1997 03:22:56 -0800
Subject: CAC_Mail: Re: racist

I feel sorry for you, Ray. I could, like Jesus in His words,call
self-righteous, judgmental, condescending, pharisiacal
people like yourself, “You snake. You viper!” But I won’t.
Which is more kind than you implying my brother, Sze-kar,
is a swine. Now you have justification for accusing me of
not becoming like Christ. It is fortunate for you that I am in
a very good, holiday, gracious mood as I write this.

As a matter of statement, your definition/idea of a racist is too
narrow. My racism is no more than racial favoritism and
preference. It’s the reason I married a Chinese girl, love
Chinese food, subscribe to CAC, pastored Chinese churches,
evangelize Chinese Americans, etc. You will never
understand this, but I consider Chinese more an extended
family than I would other races; and I favor my family
. . . and I want my family to win!

This is a far cry from the racism that espouses racial superiority,
bigotry, and/or discrimination.

Oh, I love black gospel music in worship and prefer it over the
most white music (whatever that is) . . .unfortunately, it doesn’t
sound the same when I sing and dance to it. And one of my
favorite preachers is TD Jakes, a black preacher, who sweats
profusely when he preaches. I guess I’m a racist in your eyes.
But that’s okay because my relationship with Christ is solid;
I’m in love with Him and He is with me.

For Him who chose the Jews (over the Chinese, blacks, etc.)

bill leong

Ray Downen wrote:
>
> It’s too bad that you are and are unrepentent! Do you assume that GOD
> likes yellow skins better than white or brown? You should know
> better. If you are NOT seeking to become like Jesus, there’s
> something wrong with your profession of faith in Him as Lord.

——————————

From: “Ray Downen”
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 08:31:38 +0000
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: racist

I hear you saying that YOUR racism is not objectional racism, and
Sze-kar’s politics are perfectly acceptable and desirable since he
can refer us to a Bible verse that applies to a theocracy and say
that this means we in a democracy are to take certain actions.
I heard about an ignorant preacher lately who preached a
sermon on SIN IS SIN. Well, it is unless the sinner can redefine it!
To imagine that God PREFERS yellow skin or black skin or “white” skin
is to claim more than the truth supports.
RACISM is RACISM.
U.S. Christians have no right to try to create in this free nation a
theocracy where their political theories could be forced on every
citizen.
Those who sin shouldn’t BRAG about their sin in a public forum.

> Date: Thu, 04 Dec 1997 03:22:56 -0800
> From: ohbrudder
> Reply-to: ohbrudder@prodigy.net
> Organization: Prodigy Internet
> To: CAC
> Subject: CAC_Mail: Re: racist

> I feel sorry for you, Ray. I could, like Jesus in His words,call
> self-righteous, judgmental, condescending, pharisiacal
> people like yourself, “You snake. You viper!” But I won’t.
> Which is more kind than you implying my brother, Sze-kar,
> is a swine. Now you have justification for accusing me of
> not becoming like Christ. It is fortunate for you that I am in
> a very good, holiday, gracious mood as I write this.
>
> As a matter of statement, your definition/idea of a racist is too
> narrow. My racism is no more than racial favoritism and
> preference. It’s the reason I married a Chinese girl, love
> Chinese food, subscribe to CAC, pastored Chinese churches,
> evangelize Chinese Americans, etc. You will never
> understand this, but I consider Chinese more an extended
> family than I would other races; and I favor my family
> . . . and I want my family to win!
>
> This is a far cry from the racism that espouses racial superiority,
> bigotry, and/or discrimination.
>
> Oh, I love black gospel music in worship and prefer it over the
> most white music (whatever that is) . . .unfortunately, it doesn’t
> sound the same when I sing and dance to it. And one of my
> favorite preachers is TD Jakes, a black preacher, who sweats
> profusely when he preaches. I guess I’m a racist in your eyes.
> But that’s okay because my relationship with Christ is solid;
> I’m in love with Him and He is with me.
>
> For Him who chose the Jews (over the Chinese, blacks, etc.)
>
> bill leong
>
> Ray Downen wrote:
> >
> > It’s too bad that you are and are unrepentent! Do you assume that GOD
> > likes yellow skins better than white or brown? You should know
> > better. If you are NOT seeking to become like Jesus, there’s
> > something wrong with your profession of faith in Him as Lord.
>
from Ray Downen respectfully on this day of the Lord.
417/782-0814 2228 Porter Joplin Mission Outreach.
Mail address is P O Box 1065 Joplin MO 64802-1065.
Internet home page addr = http://www.ipa.net/~outreach

——————————

From: jtc10@juno.com (J Chang)
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 18:04:38 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: Guess Who’s Been Skipping Church?

Dear CACers:

FYI, J. Chang
– ——————-

At a press conference called to expose Promise Keepers’
“sinister” agenda, the National Organization for Women
screened a video tape that showed Christian, PK-supporting
women singing, “I Surrender All.” This, NOW said, was
proof positive that PK really wants to dominate women.

Apparently it took a reporter who was attending the press
conference to point out that the song was a classic hymn
and the “surrendering” in question was to God.

(Taken from “Focus on the Family Citizen” magazine, Nov. 97)

——————————

From: TSTseng
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 1997 00:48:33 EST
Subject: Re: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: racist

Dear Brothers Ray and Bill:

If I may interrupt you guys, I’d like to request that you continue your debate
in private. It is crossing the lines of civility. – Tim Tseng

In a message dated 12/4/97 11:23:40 AM, outreach@ipa.net wrote:

<>

——————————

From: TSTseng
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 1997 01:05:06 EST
Subject: Re: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: Bill Lee and Affirmative Action

DC:

Well, that wasn’t exactly what I meant. I resist the “true believer” criteria
since it presumes that all who are real Christians _must_ dislike Clinton.
Wouldn’t you agree that liking or disliking Clinton ought not be a doctrinal
test? I dislike Clinton, not so much for his lack of character, but for his
unwillingness to stand firm on principles (to be fair, in such a polarized
environment, it is difficult for anyone in his position to stick to one’s
political convictions).

All the best. – Tim

In a message dated 12/4/97 6:39:48 PM, DCChuang@aol.com wrote:

<>

——————————

From: gdot@juno.com (G Ottoson)
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 22:24:23 -0700
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: A CAC perspective

On Thu, 4 Dec 1997 00:13:34 -0500 (EST) SKYLeung@aol.com writes:
>
>How do CACers..vote? …Is it values, ideas, or the economy?
>

Hi Stephen–

Interesting stuff your writing these days! Keep up the good work!

Re: Voting

(1) Apparently, for many people the personality of the candidate(s) is
the big factor. E.g. Acc to ABC tonite, the 1960 Nixon vs. Kennedy debate
was the first televised debate betw candidates for the Am. Presidency.
Kennedy was (indeed) very impressive, strong; Nixon appeared unsure of
himself. The story is that Kennedy’s TV ‘performance’ made the election
CLOSE (otherwise, being Catholic, i.e. generating a Republican-fed
paranoia that ‘the Pope would run Am.’, he would not have stood a
chance.) I think ABC said the margin by which JFK won is about 168,000
votes.

(2) Food for thought–nothing to do with CAC I hope:) Supposedly, acc to
ABC, given the CLOSE race, the small margin of victory for Kennedy in
1960 is traceable to a political deal cut betw Jos. Kennedy, JFK’s dad,
and ‘the Outfit’, i.e. the Giancana-run Chicago mob which allegedly
influenced voting in big cities in three key states–Nevada, Missouri,
and Illinois. JFK and his brother, Bobby, had been prosecuting partic the
Chicago mafia in conjunction with labor/labor bosses such as Jimmy Hoffa
(whose son, JP Hoffa, Jr., now has the inside track on the Teamster
General Presidency). Allegedly Giancana wanted the assurance of relief
from the prosecution in exchange for influencing the election in favor of
JFK…and to make a long story short…allegedly Giancana ultimately
ordered the Kennedy assassination.

G

——————————

From: jtc10@juno.com (J Chang)
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 20:31:48 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: Pro-life Movement: Questions for Fellow CACers, Responses Invited

Dear Sze-kar:

Thanks for your perspectives on a recent post!

On Fri, 28 Nov 1997 17:11:45 -0500 Sze-kar Wan
writes:

>As someone who is profoundly committed to the prolife platform, I
>would say that there is still selfinterest. Perhaps not in the same
sense
>as other political or ethnic groups. But if we believe in a cause,
there
>is political interest to be gained. Which is OK. One ought never
>stop our commitments just because we detect human motives.

There are many pro-life groups that have explicit political goals in the
efforts to legally end the existence of abortion. However, there are
also
many other pro-life organizations that are non-political in nature,
focusing
only on community education, client counseling, free pregnancy testing,
etc. Many volunteer of their time, energy, & finances selflessly for the
sake of the Kingdom in this particular arena. But I do agree with you
in
that if we “micro-analyze” anyone for the presence of any scintilla of
human self-interest, we would most likely find some.

Since we’ve started a new thread, I would like to expand on this pro-life
issue.
I am glad to find any believer committed to the pro-life platform! As
you may
already know, this Jan. 98 will mark the 25th anniversary of the infamous
Supreme Court “Roe v. Wade” ruling which helped to legalize abortion on
demand in the U.S. Since then, about 1.5 million abortions have taken
place each year, for a cumulative total of over 36 million abortions
since
1973. There are over 4,000 abortions on a daily basis in the U. S.
alone,
And that’s not counting the ones internationally and the “infanticide”
situations where some babies (usually female) are killed immediately
after
birth in China with a “one child per couple” policy.

The numbers can sometimes be so large that they become meaningless.
One can easily be numbed to the tragedy of lost lives through abortion.
Inside
in our hearts, we feel that abortion is wrong. Inside our theological
minds, we
know that abortion is wrong. With our mouths, we may say that abortion
is
wrong. But do we really believe our own rhetoric? Do believers really
care
about the many innocent, helpless lives being lost? It may be that the
only
reason why abortion still continues in the US is because not all
believers
have taken this issue seriously in earnestly praying & working towards
providing alternatives to abortion, eliminating the need for abortion, &
ending
the legality of abortion itself. What a sad commentary on the Church &
on this
nation when even the gruesome partial-birth abortions are still legally
permitted. I & fellow believers in the Body need to repent for my/our
apathy.

Unfortunately, the abortion issue touches the lives of those we may know.
Statistically, about one out of every six women in the US who has an
abortion
comes from an evangelical background. Does anybody have any figures
regarding abortion within the Asian community? I wouldn’t doubt that some

Asian women who have abortions are within our own families, Bible study
groups, fellowships, neighborhoods, & work places. With the strong
cultural
need to save “face,” not many would know about it.

Here are some open questions for any CACer to respond to:

1) How prevalent are abortions within the various CACers’ home churches
or circle of contacts?
2) How many CAC pastors/lay leaders have preached or taught on the issue
of the sanctity of human life?
3) How many CACers have heard their pastor/lay leaders preach or teach on
this same topic?
4) How many CACers are involved in any level of the pro-life movement?
5) Are there any other CACers out there of similar or different
convictions?
6) Why do Asian churches appear to be so silent on the sanctity of human
life
or abortion issue?
7) For those who have had some experience in counseling Am-Asians, what
would be some effective ways of ministering to Am-Asians who are in
crisis
pregnancy situations?
8) For those who have been involved politically in the pro-life movement,
what
has been your experiences as an Am-Asian?
9) For those who have ministered to Am-Asian youth, what has been
effective
in presenting topics related to sexual purity/abstinence?

Here’s a great chance for interested CAC lurkers especially to respond!
It would be helpful to get a grass roots feel among fellow CACers. BTW,
the
week of Jan. 18-24, 1998 has been designated as the “Sanctity of Human
Life Week” in solemn commemoration of “Roe v. Wade’s” 25th anniversary.

In Him,
J. Chang

P.S. Sze-kar, I know that you’re under many time pressures now. So don’t
feel a
need to respond right away or at all, although your insights are always
welcomed.

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Fri, 05 Dec 1997 00:36:00 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: racist

Brothers Ray and Bill…

I add my ‘amen’ to Tim’s request. Reading your salvos both saddens me
and tempts me to cancel my CAC subscription. This kind of ‘flaming’ is
just what I hoped wouldn’t take place in this venue. I’m praying for
you both as my brothers in Christ.

Shalom, ken fong

——————————

From: jtc10@juno.com (J Chang)
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 1997 02:56:29 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: Clinton

Dear Tim:

On Fri, 5 Dec 1997 01:05:06 EST TSTseng writes:

> I dislike Clinton, not so much for his lack of character, but
>for his
>unwillingness to stand firm on principles (to be fair, in such a
>polarized
>environment, it is difficult for anyone in his position to stick to
>one’s
>political convictions).

IMHO, character is related to the ability to follow through on a
principled conviction in spite of the surrounding environment.
I agree though that it is very difficult.

But the ability to firm on principles could be viewed in either a
positive
or negative light depending on one’s policy position. Unfortunately,
Clinton does have an extremely firm, consistent, but radical view on
abortion throughout his presidency. (BTW, I understand that his
position on abortion has hardened as president since his days as
governor in Arkansas.)

He advocates a stand where abortions would be permitted in all
nine months of pregnancy, regardless of fetal viabiltiy or health, even
through the means of a horrible partial-birth abortion procedure or an
abortifacient (such as RU-486), even for the purposes of fetal
sex-selection, even on military or prison locations, even if no parental
consent has been granted, even if no information about the risks
of abortions has been communicated to the woman, even if abortion
clinics are not required to be licensed or to report abortion-related
maternal deaths or injuries to the Center for Disease Control (CDC),
and if need be, have abortions subsidized by you & me with our hard-
earned taxes. To add insult to injury, with more of our taxes, to then
export this abortion-on-demand philosophy internationally through the
various UN “population control” programs.

One can hardly admire him for his “firmness” on this issue. I can
imagine how the stomachs of concerned believers all over the world
must churn every time Clinton talks about “caring” for the children of
our future generations.

In Him,
J.Chang

——————————

From: ohbrudder
Date: Fri, 05 Dec 1997 03:56:13 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: racist

My apologies to all CACers. I allowed my pride to get
the better of me. Please forgive me.

bill leong

——————————

From: gdot@juno.com
Date: Fri, 05 Dec 1997 13:59:45 EST
Subject: CAC_Mail: Re: ROMAN Catholics Loyal to Pope?

(CAC, fyi–G)

On Fri, 5 Dec 1997 11:18:55 +0000 “Ray Downen” writes:
>Gary,
> I agree there’s lots to think about..
>

[[12/4 <> ]]

Also to consider, as well, Is the Pope anti-American?

========

Re: the loyalty of Catholics, While many Cath I know embrace the Pope as
‘earthly Father’, many (of the same) also do not respect/abide by his
‘authority’/teaching esp on the restricted role of women in
Church/society, the celibacy of the priesthood, abortion/birth control
issues. Things may have changed to be more this way since the 60s, I
dunno, but many Cath people I work with are disloyal Catholics in the
sense of actively engaging the Bible’s authority via the Holy
Spirit…e.g. reading it/Paul and praying together before faculty mtgs..G

PS Pls take a look at this recent article, also from an ABC News source
(http://www.abcnews.com):

<<
Internal and External Issues Challenge the American Church

Catholic Church Struggles

"We look at the world that is culturally Catholic, but there is not as
much
real practice of the faith."
– – Archbishop Theodore McCarick

By Barr Seitz
ABCNEWS.com
Nov. 16 – In the United States, where divorce rates hover at 50 percent
and
abortion is protected by law, the Roman Catholic church is fighting for
relevancy. Which religious denomination has the most members in America?

Pope John Paul led a Mass on Sunday at Saint Peter's Basilica to open a
month-long special meeting, known as a synod, of church men from North
and
South America. This special assembly at the Vatican will grapple with
some of the Roman Catholic Church's most pressing problems, including how
to win back those who have left the church.

The Pope appealed to bishops from the Americas to work with fresh
missionary zeal to win back lapsed Catholics to the church.

How to answer the attraction of evangelical sects-one of the chief
magnets for disenchanted Catholics-is a key that Pope John Paul II has
put
high on the agenda for the synod of bishops, which opens Monday.

Pope John Paul II wants the bishops of the Americas to spend a month
discussing a range of topics including more aggressive efforts to spread
the
word of the Bible.

"We look at the world that is culturally Catholic, but there is not as
much real practice of the faith," says Archbishop Theodore McCarick of
Newark.

Catholics Losing Ground

Still far and away the largest single denomination in the United States,
Catholics are losing influence to Protestant evangelical and Pentecostal
denominations.

In the past 10 years, Catholic Church attendance
The Catholic church is the largest U.S. religious denomination since the
American Protestants are divided into a variety of evangelical,
Pentecostal
and traditional denominations. (ABCNEWS.com) has declined by 15 percent,
the numbers of men joining the priesthood or religious orders have
dropped 15
percent, and those of women joining sisterhoods have dropped 30 percent.

Catholics are fighting an uphill battle. “How do you give meaning to a
population that has already found meaning in job satisfaction, sexuality,
entertainment, luxury and narcotics?” says Archbishop Pilarczyk of
Cincinnati.

New Religions Make Faith Easier

More charismatic denominations like the Southern Baptists and
Pentecostals
seem to have found some answers and have moved in to challenge the
primacy of both the Catholic church and established Protestant
denominations.

Evangelical groups more than doubled in size in the last 10 years. These
groups provide a direction for those who want to listen, a mysticism that
brings people directly to the “Holy Spirit,” and they saturate the
television and radio waves.

“There is more clarity in evangelical churches, and they have a clearer
stronger message,” says George Gallup, chairman of the George H. Gallup
Institute, a non-profit group that studies American sociological trends.
“The
church is healing them and reaching their lives.”

“It is less complex than the teachings of the Catholic church,” says
Pilarczyk. “It gives immediate and uncomplicated answers.”

Internal Divisions Block Change

The American Catholic church has divided on how to address the
challenges,
particularly what role women should have and whether they should be
ordained.

“The general theme is that the status quo is under some attack,” says
Dean Hoges, an expert of Catholicism at Washington’s Catholic University.
“The Catholic community is already fairly polarized.”

American efforts to explore the possibility of ordaining women to make
up for the declining numbers of men entering the priesthood have not
impressed the pope.

“The Vatican is quite clear that it wants to keep older forms in tact,”
says Hoges. “But there is so much diversity, and many people restless
with
status quo.” >>

G

——————————

From: JLoFEC@aol.com
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 1997 19:59:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: CAC_Mail: Chinese-American Demographics

All –

On 1/19-20, I will be participating in something called the Asian Task Force
Summit in Los Angeles. This gathering, sponsored by the US Spiritual Warfare
Network, is for Asian-American pastors and others in North America, to get
together, network and strategize about how we can work together to see
revival come to our peoples. Part of the time will be spent in focus groups
by ethnicity, where I and whichever other Chinese-Americans show up will meet
together and strategize on how we can reach our kinsmen.

Cost is $25. Cindy Jacobs, Dr. Peter Wagner and others will be hosting the
gathering. If any of you are interested in getting more information, please
e-mail me and I’ll send you some info pronto.

In any case, in order to prepare for the meeting, there are two sets of
questions which I wanted to ask all of you, hoping to gather some helpful
information. The first set of questions re: demographics. In a second post
(so we can keep the two items separate), I’ll be asking another set of
questions.

Here, what I’d like to know is:
* What are the latest estimates of Chinese in the US and Canada?
* What percentage of them are native-born (ABC or CBC)?
* What percentage of either of these categories are Christian and are going
to church?

Along the lines of the last question, I have often heard that the % of
Chinese who are churched is somewhere in the 6-8% category, and the % of ABCs
even less. (Barna and Gallup seem to agree that the % of Christian
churchgoing Americans is ~40%, which means that Chinese are 5-6X more
unreached that their American counterparts) .I don’t really know if those
numbers can be substantiated. I do know that the way people seem to come up
with these numbers is to say, “in the greater LA area, there are 270 Chinese
churches, which average 100 people. That makes 27,000 Christians. Since there
are 300,000 Chinese in the area, that means we are reaching 9% (I’m making
these figures up).

Of course, that methodology is a little suspect. Is there hard data along
these lines? I am specially interested in the whether the percentages go up
or down by assimilation factors. I do know that in the LA area, there are
perhaps 250-300 Chinese churches, but there are probably only 30-50 churches
which have English ministries focusing on adults. When I was in seminary, I
was told that the % of ABCs in the US was > 50%. I am sure that is no longer
the case, but even if the % is 40%, there seems to be a highly
disproportionate amount of ministry energy directed at ABCs.

What are your thoughts?

John

* * * *
John Lo
Pastor of Youth and Young Adults
First Evangelical Church, Glendale, CA
818.240.5633
JLoFEC@aol.com
* * * *

——————————

From: JLoFEC@aol.com
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 1997 19:59:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: CAC_Mail: Underlying Spiritual Issues

All –

In my last e-mail, I mentioned something about the upcoming Asian Task Force
Summit meeting in LA in 1/98. I asked some questions re: demographics which I
help can help me (and us) get some hard data which we can use in our
ministries.

The second set of questions I want to ask have to do with underlying
spiritual issues. Whatever you or I think of the Spiritual Warfare movement
and stuff like Spiritual Mapping (which I personally don’t really understand
all that well anyway), I believe that the work of ministry is based on a
number factors:
(a) how effective and culturally relevant the evangelism to the unsaved
is;
(b) how effective churches and ministries are in creating places where the
newly-saved can be effectively incorporated, discipled and equipped to reach
out;

I don’t think there would be any argument about these two points. However, I
also believe that an often overlooked component to (a) is prayer.
Specifically, targeted, strategic prayer.

The thought here is that just as the Lord seems to move in our midst and
churches in different seasons and different ways, so does Satan. I am not
trying to glorify his work in any way, but I believe that he is able to blind
the minds of unbelievers (The god of this age has blinded the minds of
unbelievers, so that they cannot see the light of the gospel of the glory of
Christ, who is the image of God – 2 Cor 4.4), and he does so in specific ways
to specific people.

I think that we have to take a multi-pronged approach to ministry. We need to
work hard at (a) and (b) above, but also ask God wisdom whether we’d get more
bang for our buck if we can learn to pray more powerful and strategic
prayers, so that our gospel would more often find good seed instead of stony
soil as we’re busy scattering it around.

The question I have been thinking about is this:
* What is it that Satan uses to blind the minds of Chinese-Americans so that
cannot recieve the gospel? What cultural baggage, history, fears,
preoccupations or whatever do you see as spiritual roots that need to be
“pulled out” so that our gospel can find better soil?
* Do you think the spiritual issues change with assimilation?

What I am hoping to come up with are some specific things that we can begin
to pray over, so that (to change the metaphor) as we pray, the spiritual
atmosphere and clouds over the places we live will lift, and we and our
neighbors can see the spiritual truths much more clearly.

Any thoughts appreciated.

Thanks.

John

* * * *
John Lo
Pastor of Youth and Young Adults
First Evangelical Church, Glendale, CA
818.240.5633
JLoFEC@aol.com
* * * *

——————————

From: SKYLeung
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 1997 00:06:36 EST
Subject: CAC_Mail: Fwd: ’98 World Christian Conference

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Dear CAC,

I forward this as requested by Brother Dave. Interesting to note that one of
our own is one of the speakers!

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Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 15:42:07 -0500 (EST)
From: “David C. Yao”
X-Sender: dyao@phir.sph.jhu.edu
Reply-To: “David C. Yao”
To: Steve Leung
Subject: ’98 World Christian Conference (fwd)
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Dear Steve, Please post on CAC. Thanks! –David
__________________________________________________

Please send this to anyone interested in learning more about God’s Heart for
the World.
***************************************************************
1998 World Christian Conference
Launch Out! Claiming our legacy: Discipling the nations
February 13-16, 1998
Redwood Christian Park, Santa Cruz, CA
***************************************************************

PURPOSE OF WORLD CHRISTIAN CONFERENCE

The World Christian Conference seeks to challenge and mobilize Chinese
Christians in North America to fulfill their calling in God’s
global plan — making disciples of all nations. The conference began in
1985 as the World Christian Conference for Chinese Graduates
(WCCCG) when its founders saw the need to bring Chinese Christian brothers
and sisters together to challenge them to respond to the
needs of the unreached peoples of the world as well as the need for more
full-time workers in North America.

Each year since 1985, brother and sisters, primarily from Chinese churches
on the West Coast, have come together in a forum where
biblical teaching is given, models and examples are presented, and
practical issues are discussed. The fellowship among those
attending the conference usually continues well beyond it as like-minded
brothers and sisters from different churches networks
together, helping each other to move on in their own World Christian journey.

By God’s grace, many alumni of the World Christian Conference have moved
into various ministries, locally and abroad. Others
continue to live out their World Christian calling and spread the World
Christian vision here in North America. We are seeing that God
calls His people to fulfill His plan through different and complementary
roles. It is our prayer that through this conference, more and
more Chinese Christians will work to bring about the completion of God’s
global plan, and in doing so, hasten the return of our Lord.

1998 THEME: LAUNCH OUT! CLAIMING OUR LEGACY: DISCIPLING THE NATIONS

We’re pilgrims on a journey of the narrow road
And those who’ve gone before us line the way
Cheering on the faithful, encouraging the weary,
Their lives a stirring testament to God’s sustaining grace.

Oh, may all who come behind us find us faithful.
May the fire of our devotion light their way.
May the footprints that we leave lead them to believe,
And the lives we live inspire them to obey.
Oh, may all who come behind us find us faithful.
from “Find Us Faithful” by Steve Green

These words capture the essence of our aspirations for WCC ’98.

Let us Launch Out! to:
…..heed the Master’s call, “Launch out into the deep” (Lk 5.4 KJV)
…..explore obstacles to obedience.
…..discover the next step in our pilgrimage.
…..take our place in history’s unbroken stream of witnesses.
…..claim our legacy to disciple the nations in our generation.

Too often we stand on the shore, securely moored to the status quo,
watching and admiring others launch out. We are secure, yet restless. We
smell the salt air and wonder what it would take to “go for it”–to join
the company of those whose lives burn for the glory of God throughout the
earth.

Do you long for more, yet hesitate? Do you wonder what your place is in
the World Christian movement? Come spend a rich weekend away in prayer,
worship, reflection and networking. Come hear the testimonies and
reflections of those who have gone before us–some just ahead, some at
the height, and others at the sunset of their journeys. Come renew your
commitment to follow the Lord through the adventure of faith.

God calls us to be a community of faith-filled pioneers. Just as Abraham
obeyed and went out “whither he knew not,” so we join the hosts of
witnesses who have gone before us. We launch out with hearts made brave
to go against the tide of opposition. Let us fix our eyes on Jesus and
claim our legacy–discipling the nations in our generation.

CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Dr. Samuel Ling (General Director, China Horizon)
Born in Hong Kong, Dr. Samuel Ling belongs to the fourth generation
of a life of full time pastors and Christian workers. He came to the
United States at age 14, and graduated from the University of
Pennsylvania (History 1971), Westminster Theological Seminary (M. Div
1975, Th.M. Missions 1978) and Temple University (Ph. D. History 1981).
Since 1980 Dr. Ling and his wife, Mildred, have served the Lord in
the areas of church planting, pastoral ministry (New York City and
Chicago), starting and directing China Horizon (a ministry which develops
mainland Chinese Christian leadership), and writing (over 500 published
articles in various periodicals around the world).

Elizabeth Lowe (Minister-at-Large, OMF U.S.)
Elizabeth Lowe is a popular speaker in conferences, Bible College
campuses, churches, and other meetings. As Minister-at-Large for OMF
since 1995, she has been presenting the challenge of missions to
Christians worldwide. Her lecture have taken her to various parts of the
world, including most of the Western world and Asia.
She has a Masters degree in Chinese Studies from UCLA and has
lectured extensively on China. As coordinator for OMF’s China Awareness
Seminar, her passion is speaking to people about ministry in China.

WORKSHOPS

A. Get in the Boat! Gaining a World Christian Vision
B. Serving as Sender
C. Living and Serving as a World Christian Family
D. Developing a World Christian Vision in Your Church
E. Assessing Yourself for Overseas Ministry
F. Professional Services in Creative Access Nations
G. Becoming a World Christian Pastor
H. Facing the Unknown

REGISTRATION
Postmarked by December 31, 1997: $175
Postmarked by January 15, 1998: $185
Late registration (space permitting): $195
Pastoral Staff (by January 15, 1998): Free
Pastoral Staff (after January 15, 1998) $100

More information:
in Northern Cal:
Gem Cheng (650) 878-0431
in Southern Cal:
Derrick Tan (626) 309-1179
Web site: http://www.octlab.com/wcc98

– –part0_881384796_boundary–

——————————

From: JWongCDI@aol.com
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 1997 01:11:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: WORTH FORWARDING

This was a disturbing poem, but more because of it’s mis-direction.
I sent it to our deacons with the following comment.

“Like much of this kind of literature, it reflects a popular perspective of
our culture. A good exercise would be to understand its fallacy. What would
be a different understanding of reality?”

Joe

——————————

From: TSTseng
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 1997 01:05:54 EST
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Clinton

J:

While I admire your passions about the right of life of the unborn (and again,
I am also pro-life), the anger directed at Clinton by many pro-life Christians
seems a bit excessive, IMHO. No president, Republican or Democrat, since Roe
v. Wade, has ever really put any muscle behind their “prolife” rhetoric (in in
Clinton’s case, the “making abortion rare” rhetoric). Even today’s Republican
Party and ex-Christian Coalition director Ralph Reed are down playing the
anti-abortion position.

(BTW, I read in today’s newspaper that abortions in the U.S. have declined by
5% this past year – good news, IMHO)

Again, the issue I am struggling with is one of consistency among the critics
of Clinton and the traditional “liberal” platforms:

1. Why would a party that seeks to keep government out of our lives want to
use government to impose a prolife morality? What will the party that wants
to reduce government invasion of our lives do about the corporate driven
consumer culture that is permeating almost every fabric of human existence and
creating the material causes for the eroding of basic values? Actually, the
issue is not which party. I believe that both parties are now dependent on
the pocketbooks of American and multinational corporations – neither are
accountable to ordinary people.

2. Why is there not the same anger directed at those who would pass policies
which hurt the poor, racial minorities, immigrants, and single mothers
disproportionately? (i.e., if we must balance the federal budget by making
sacrifices, I’d like to see everyone making proportionate sacrifices). I
remember when Reagan ran for office, he assured everyone that his “trickle
down” theories would not cut off the safety net for the poorest. Contrast
that with Bush-Clinton or Dole-Clinton! In the last two presidential
elections, the poorest were the problem! They are the ones with cultural
character flaws, without the work ethic, etc. Wouldn’t a consistent pro-life
policy take these lives into consideration?

Finally, we MUST historicize the current conservative evangelical activism on
the prolife, family values, and small government platforms. In an issue of CT
several months ago which traced the career of Francis Schaeffer, it became
clear that an evangelical consensus on the prolife and family values agenda
was not reached (and there is probably not one today) in the 1970s. Not until
late in Schaeffer’s life did the abortion issue suddenly become THE single
issue. Furthermore, it was also late in his life when he began to make
alliances with the political right and fundamentalists.

All this is to say that it was NOT inevitable for so many evangelicals to
become so staunchly anti-abortion while supporting policies that are hurting
the most vulnerable among us. Had the attack on the liberal strawman not been
used so repeatedly, I suspect that evangelicals might have shaped both
parties’ policy platforms more significantly and more positively (e.g., taking
much more seriously the moral values of feminist and racial minority
concerns). But, it appears today that the political ideologies left and right
have shaped evangelicals and “liberal” Christians more so than vice versa.

So I continue to contend that our generation of Chinese American Christians
must learn discernment and develop the ability to distinguish between rhetoric
and reality. We need to better exegete the (sub)culture of those to whom God
has called us to minister. Sze-kar calls it “self-determination” – and I
agree with him. – Tim

In a message dated 12/5/97 2:51:28 AM, jtc10@juno.com wrote:

<>

– ————————————————————
Rev. Dr. Timothy Tseng
Sallie Knowles Crozer Assistant Professor of American Religious History
Colgate-Rochester Divinity School
1100 South Goodman Street
Rochester, NY 14620
OFF: (716) 271-1320, ext. 260
FAX: (716) 271-8013
Email: tstseng@aol.com
– ————————————————————

——————————

From: TSTseng
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 1997 01:32:02 EST
Subject: Re: Re: CAC_Mail: A CAC perspective

G:

Perhaps some conspiracy theories hold more weight than others? 🙂 – Tim

In a message dated 12/5/97 1:39:43 AM, gdot@juno.com wrote:

<>

——————————

From: bowyoung@juno.com (Brian H Owyoung)
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 1997 09:14:19 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Chinese-American Demographics

Not sure if this the proper forum for such a request but thought I would
give it a try. I am involved in a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural church
plant in Castro Valley, CA. (East bay side in the San Francisco Bay Area)
The name of our church is Pathway Community Church which is a little
over two months old. I am pastoring the church bivocationally.
Currently we have a great need for a youth pastor. We would like to find
someone who has an interest and a heart for youth (Junior and Senior
highers). The person would have to be willing to initially be
bivocational. If you know of someone please have them email me (Brian
Owyoung at bowyoung@juno.com) Thank you.

——————————

From: DC Chuang
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 1997 14:06:39 EST
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: Bill Lee and Affirmative Action

In a message dated 97-12-05 11:07:35 EST, you write:

<>

Tim, I tend to see things in black and white, though I’m seeing more gray in
my old age (no pun intended). However, I cannot see how anyone who is
familiar with his “antics” and deeds could fail to see how contrary it is to
Biblical principles. My point being, there is a right and a wrong and people
need to be able to distinguish between them. If we have trouble seeing this
in such an obvious example (IMHO), how can we understand and resolve more
complex issues.

<>

I see character and principles as being intertwined, as someone pointed out
earlier.

I read an article in the Washington Post back during the first election which
analyzed Clinton. Before then I couldn’t understand how someone could be so
unprincipled and lie (simple put) as if it meant nothing. But in his twisted
world, any means can justify the end. Definitely not an example any Christian
should follow.

Regards, DC

——————————

From: Fenggang Yang
Date: Sat, 06 Dec 1997 14:58:42 -0600
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Demographics and % Christians

JLoFEC@aol.com wrote on Friday, December 05, 1997
>Here, what I’d like to know is:
>* What are the latest estimates of Chinese in the US and Canada?
>* What percentage of them are native-born (ABC or CBC)?
>* What percentage of either of these categories are Christian and are
going
>to church?

The 1990 U.S. Census reports that there were 1,645,472 Chinese, among
them, 69.3% were foreign born. The proportion of ABCs superseded OBCs
only in the census years of 1940 (51.9%), 1950 (53.0%), 1960 (60.5%),
and 1970 (53.1%). However, by 1980, OBCs again superseded ABCs, 63.3%.
Because of continuous high volume Chinese immigration from the PRC,
Taiwan, Hong Kong, and other countries in the last two decades, I think
the trend is still clear: there are more OBCs than ABCs. If you really
want to know the latest estimates, you may check the U.S. Census Bureau
website. They may have them.

Now, the percentage of Christians among Chinese Americans is extremely
problematic. Some Chinese Christian leaders have made knowledgeable
attempts to count and estimate. For example, Dr. WingNing Pang came out
a 10% estimate in his papers/reports, but I’ve personally heard some
pastors, including Samuel Ling, saying that that number was too high. A
conservative estimate would be 5%, or 7% at best. In 1996, Rev. Dr.
James Chuck (American Baptist Seminary of the West) wrote: “All factors
considered, Chinese youth and adult participation in Protestant churches
is probably more near the 5% range… what we see currently may not be
keeping up with the explosive growth of the Chinese population in the
United States.” This estimate was based on his visits and surveying all
Chinese churches in the San Francisco and Bay Area.

However, several survey studies based on scientific sampling in some
metropolitan areas put the number _much much much_ higher, for example,
up to 32% Protestants among Chinese in Los Angeles (see Los Angeles
Times July 5, 1997, section B page 5). Some social scientific surveys
in Chicago and Seattle came up similar percentages. As a sociologist
myself, I tend to accept the survey numbers.

Then, the question is, how can you explain the radical discrepancies
between these survey results and Chinese Christian leaders’ informed
estimates. I have some speculations, but to keep this email short, I
want to hear your comments first.
– —————————————————————
Fenggang Yang, Ph.D. fyang@uh.edu
Department of Sociology http://www.uh.edu/~fyang
University of Houston 713-743-3943 (FAX)
Houston, TX 77204-3474 713-743-3973 (phone)

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Sat, 06 Dec 1997 13:01:31 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Chinese-American Demographics

[this message is also being sent to leaders in our church and a broader
circle of my friends to give them a snapshot of where we are today. Why
write all this and not get the most out of it, right?]

Hey, Dr. O, so that’s where you went after Berkeley Layman! We should
compare notes some times, for the church I’m leading now, Evergreen-LA,
is a “multi-Asian, multi-ethnic” one. The Lord has given us roughly 45%
Chinese, 30% JA, 7% KA, 8% SEA, 5% Euro-Am, 5% Other (Asian Indian, Pac.
Isl, AfrAm, MexAm, etc.). Generationally, we have 1st (none over 50
yoa) through 5th. Age-wise, we have babies through folks in their
eighties. The vision the Lord has given to us is to free Him to build a
“Sedaqah Community” out of us all…one where living in right
relationships (Greatest Commandment) is the pervasive goal.

I’ve been at this church since 1978, first as an intern, than its first
associate pastor and first ABC staff person. Over the years, as the
Lord grew the church, I eventually become the Sr. Assoc. Pastor to
Pastor Cory Ishida. Last March, for those who haven’t heard, he felt
led to lead our church to ‘hive,’ essentially a friendly church split.
Given the fact that I felt led to stay at the current site, he and his
part of the staff left for a temporary location with approx. 650
people. This was roughly 65% of the congregation, with most of the
young families and probably 75% of the tithers and significant givers
and 80% of CS teachers/staff and 90% of the youth advisers, both choir
directors and 95% of the old choir. Oh, and 90% of all cash on hand. I
share this with you so that you (Brian) might better appreciate that,
even though this isn’t technically a new church start like yours, in
many ways, this was/is a new church start. Yes, we had at the outset
about 400 people, but really only about 100 were really committed. The
vast majority of our people were formally marginal, at best. Just came
on Sundays, not really plugged in, not tithing. We had to start with a
whole new board, which has been a blessing in disguise since we’re
shifting paradigms, and a staff of myself, 3 f/t assoc. pastors, 1 h/t
assoc. pastor, a f/t church administrator, 1 h/t ministry associate, and
2 p/t seminary pastoral interns. (and a partridge in a pear tree!) Oh,
we got the site, which is paid off, 98% of the inventory, and the luxury
of not having to set up each Sunday morning. We also inherited the need
to raise $1M in the next year to begin construction of the second phase
of our campus due to our having run out of extensions with the city for
our modular structures.

The launch date for both our churches was March 1, 1997. Since that
time, we have seen the Lord bless the efforts of so many people. Over
50 people of all ages and ethnicities just went through our membership
class, with 30+ just being voted in. There are about 100 more waiting
for the next classes. This Christmas Eve, our new choir (40+) will be
singing a beautiful cantata. More and more formally fringe folk are
stepping forward to serve and lead. Roughly 500 people now pack our
sanctuary each week and the artists and musicians, more and more, have
been turned loose to create moving, mystical worship experiences. I
even feel more energized in the pulpit than ever before! We’re reaching
out to our surrounding community now, and we currently are blessed to
see 28% of our attenders now part of our Neighborhood Sedaqah Bible
Studies. Budget-wise, we are running behind our faith total, but praise
the Lord, we are still in the black. Given the size of my staff, the
fact that we haven’t had to dip into the surplus (which was only a month
and a half’s worth after the asset allocation) is truly a tribute to the
Lord’s provision and our constant need to place our faith in Him.

Most of all, I hear from the folks led to stay with me that (a) they are
so excited about the push towards being a multi-Asian, multi-ethic
congregation, one that is more plugged in with the other churches in our
community, b/c they feel the Lord’s pleasure, and (b) they truly believe
that what is taking shape overall is a prototype (my term) for a 21st
century church.

Sorry, didn’t mean to blab on and on. If you get nothing from this
report, it’s that God is faithful, especially as we all risk stepping
out of the status quo and into the kingdom!

Peace,
ken fong
sr. pastor
Evergreen Baptist Church of Los Angeles
Rosemead, CA

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Sat, 06 Dec 1997 13:12:27 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: Bill Lee and Affirmative Action

This ongoing dialogue about the connection between character and
competence form our political leaders makes me wonder if ANY of our
prior Presidents would have been able to withstand the microscope of
today. Washington owned slaves, for example. But who knows if he was
faithful to Martha at all times. By now, we’ve all heard how FDR was
unfaithful to Eleanor, yet he proved to be a tremendous leader of this
country during one of its darkest hours. ’nuff said about JFK. I
mention this, not to say that as a Christian adult who votes I should
only be concerned in our, in this case, Presidents’ policies and
decisions. Rather, to make the point that the media scrutinizing that
we all seem to have come to expect is a very recent invention or
switch. The Secret Service and the White House Press Corps, for
example, up through JFK at least, were under explicit orders NOT to leak
out any of the Presidents’ pecadilloes. Now that we know some of the
dirt on them, does that diminish their historical records? Maybe to
some degree. Again, not necessarily using this to endorse Clinton, but
what would you rather have in the White House: a deeply principled
person who didn’t know how to lead this country through a crisis, e.g.,
Carter(?), whom I have always admired, or a person who was obviously
flawed in his/her personal life but was highly capable in leading this
country?

I’m not offering an answer. Just some more grist for the mill.

If any of you are wondering why, after so much silence, I’m being so
chatty now it’s b/c El Nino has confined me to quarters today!

ken fong.

——————————

From: Sze-kar Wan
Date: Sat, 06 Dec 1997 18:11:22 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: Appreciation

Thanks to Fenggang for his terrific post on stats and to Ken for sharing
his rich experience with his new church. I’ve learned much. Sze-kar

——————————

From: gdot@juno.com (G Ottoson)
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 1997 16:35:55 -0700
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: A CAC perspective

On Sat, 6 Dec 1997 01:32:02 EST TSTseng writes:
>G:
>
>Perhaps some conspiracy theories hold more weight than others? 🙂 –
>Tim
>

On Sat, 06 Dec 1997 13:12:27 -0800 Ken Fong
writes:

>. ’nuff said about JFK.

Pastor Ken, I guess when it rains in California it really pours…and
this is well put, too!

🙂 G

——————————

From: Fenggang Yang
Date: Sat, 06 Dec 1997 19:58:23 -0600
Subject: CAC_Mail: going beyond Chinese boundaries

– —–Original Message—–
From: Fenggang Yang
To: kenfong@earthlink.net
Date: Saturday, December 06, 1997 6:28 PM
Subject: Re: going beyond Chinese boundaries

I have been fascinated by the existence of the Evengreen Church. Thank
you, Pastor Ken Fong, for finally sharing some stories of your church.
[I think I asked you about your church a while ago]. I am very
interested in knowing more about it. Also, the new church by Brian H
Owyoung is similarly interesting. It seems that some, or many, CACs are
making efforts to go beyond Chinese ethnic and cultural boundaries. I
want to share with you that not only ABCs are trying this, some OBC
Christian leaders are also pioneering toward that direction. The first
time I heard of the call for Chinese churches to go beyond Chinese
boundaries was during the Chinese Mission ’95 in Washington DC from Rev.
Thomas Wang (Wang Yongxin). At that time I thought it was a radical
idea at this time of history. However, in Houston I have seen real
efforts of putting the idea into practice. The Houston Chinese Church,
the largest Chinese church in Houston, has started a daughtor church in
this summer with the name of “Fort Bend Community Church,” intending to
serve not only Chinese residents there, but also non-Chinese people in
the community. It is too early to tell whether they will succeed. I’m
watching it closely with sociologist eyes.

Questions: are there similar efforts in other parts of the U.S.? How
were those church-plantings started? i.g., where did the leaders get
the inspiration? is there denominational or parachurch support? Also,
what strategies have been used to achieve the goals and how effective
are they? While these questions are out of my personal and professional
curiosity, a collection of the answers to these questions may help
others who want to start similar ministries.
– —————————————————————
Fenggang Yang, Ph.D. fyang@uh.edu
Department of Sociology http://www.uh.edu/~fyang
University of Houston 713-743-3943 (FAX)
Houston, TX 77204-3474 713-743-3973 (phone)

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Sat, 06 Dec 1997 23:12:03 -0800
Subject: CAC_Mail: Re: going beyond Chinese boundaries

Fenggang,

You know, when I was writing all those particulars down, I was thinking
“Gee, this will answer those questions that F.Y. posed to me awhile back
that I didn’t have the energy to respond to at the time.” You’re
welcome.

Here’s what I know as far as multi-Asian or multi-Asian/ethnic churches
in the U.S. right now:
Evergreen Baptist-of the San Gabriel Valley/ABC-USA
Pastored by my former Sr. Described somewhat in my earlier email.
Although there are some nonAsians there, their church is predominantly
AsiAm (50% Chinese, 40% JA, 3% KA) and, for the time being, they are
sticking with the previous demographic description, i.e.,
“English-speaking AsiAms and those who closely identify with that
emerging subculture.” Everything is done in English.

Berkeley Christian Laymen Church
Rev. Wayne Ogimachi
Arose out of the tiny “nondenominational movement” in Japan. Since
Wayne’s being there (10+ yrs), the church has grown quite a bit,
attracting a good number of ABCs, especially churched ones from the Bay
Area. Still has a Japan. lang. component in the mornings, though I’m
sure quite small. Wayne can tell you much more about it.

Sturge Presbyterian Church, San Mateo, CA/PC (which one, I’m not sure)
Rev. Gerald Chinen
Dead mainline church for decades. Since Gerald’s coming over five
years ago, there’s been quite a lot of interest from others.
Historically Japanese work; don’t know if they have a language component
anymore…I’m pretty sure Gerald can’t speak Chinese. Like I theorized
in my book several years ago, it doesn’t surprise me that ABCs who
aren’t satisfied with current Chinese churches are checking out what
were originally JA churches. JAs have the most ‘westernized’
subculture. Thus, I believe that as their ‘issei’ die out in the next
10 years and as their offspring continue to marry out at the highest
rate of any group in this country, it only makes sense that more of
these JA churches can convert to AsiAm or like what we’re doing.

Asian American (?) Church, outside of Dallas
Rev. Allan Wong (?)
You’d probably know more about this, Fenggang, than me. Met him
this summer and was pleasantly surprised to hear that his church is
moving in the English-only, AsiAm direction. He’s currently working on
his DMin on this subject.

Newsong Community Church, Irvine, CA/independent, but probably aligning
with Covenant
Rev. David Gibbons
Planted less than 4 years ago by Gibbons, it began as a AsiAm church
(80% KA) but has since been taking deliberate steps to be
multe-Asian/ethnic (now only 40% KA out of about 350 people). Gibbons
is half KA. A real entrepeneur.

Parkwood Community Church, outside of Chicago, IL/independent, but
probably aligning with Covenant
Rev. Greg Wong, Rev. Peter Cha, Dr. Stephen Kim(?)
Planted 2 years ago by a bunch of AsiAm IVCF alums and current and
former staff (like Jeanette Yep). All English. ABC, KA, JA, and
probably some others.

Cornerstone Community Church, east Seattle, WA/roots in ABC/USA but
sponsored by Conservative Baptist
Pastor Joe Yoshihara
Planted 2 years ago, with a great deal of animosity from existing
local churches. All English. ABC, KA, JA. Heard it’s doing quite
well.

Cornerstone Community Church, Cerritos, CA/independent?
Rev. Donald Moy
Planted about 6 years ago by Chicago-bred ABC pastor (Moy) who was
intrigued by the opportunity to start a Willowcreek-style church for
AsiAms. I don’t have anything current on them. I think their pastor is
on CAC.

Gateway Christian Church, Walnut, CA/ABC-USA
Pastor Troy Wong
Planted 3 years ago by Evergreen, it is AsiAm, all English. Going
through a ‘hive’ of sorts now themselves as the other founding pastor,
Kevin Doi, is leaving to start an AsiAm church in North Irvine,
sponsored by EBC.SGV, by next March.

Sacramento Asian American Ministries (SAAM), Sacto, CA/ABC-USA
Pastor Richard Ross
Planted 10 years ago by some members of my family and others who
felt led to split off from FCBC, Sacto. All English. ABC, JA, some KA,
a few Caucasian.

Those are the ones that come immediately to mind. I’m sure there are
others. Anyone want to add to the list?

Ken Fong
Sr. Pastor
EBC.LA
Rosemead, CA

——————————

From: jtc10@juno.com (J Chang)
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 1997 03:00:16 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: Pro-life Challenges

Dear Tim:

Thanks for sharing some of your insights into the pro-life issues.

On Sat, 6 Dec 1997 01:05:54 EST TSTseng writes:

>While I admire your passions about the right of life of the unborn
>(and again,
>I am also pro-life), the anger directed at Clinton by many pro-life
>Christians
>seems a bit excessive, IMHO. No president, Republican or Democrat,
>since Roe
>v. Wade, has ever really put any muscle behind their “prolife”
>rhetoric (in in
>Clinton’s case, the “making abortion rare” rhetoric). Even today’s
>Republican
>Party and ex-Christian Coalition director Ralph Reed are down playing
>the anti-abortion position.

Granted, both sides (Repub. & Dems.) have their share in the
responsibility
of not helping to decrease the number of abortions. But there is still a

night & day difference between being “pro-life” & not doing enough vs.
being
“pro-abortion” & advocating policies which actually increase the number
of
abortions. (eg. with a stroke of the presidential pen: vetoing the
partial-birth
abortion ban, allowing abortions on military bases, actively promoting
FDA
fast-track approval of RU-486, pushing for tax-payer funded abortions,
etc.)
How can one even begin to compare the stark differences? One might dare
say that absolutely nothing was done to “make abortion rare” while many
things were done to help make abortions more common during these 2
presidential terms. (BTW, there are issues where I do agree with Clinton
and there are others where I disagree. However, this abortion issue
is a big doozy!) Clinton is not the enemy. I & many believers do pray
for
him as he leads this nation. However, with much trepidation, many
pro-life
believers, feel a responsibility to speak out with righteous anger.

>(BTW, I read in today’s newspaper that abortions in the U.S. have
>declined by
>5% this past year – good news, IMHO)

No need to be humble about that opinion, Tim. 🙂 I would agree with you
&
shout a big AMEN whenever unborn lives can be spared! The article
I read said that there were 1,210,883 abortions reported in the U.S. in
1995. That is down 4.5% (or 5% rounded off) from the PREVIOUS year of
1994. Unfortunately, preliminary figures show increases nationally for
1996.
(Side note: In New York City, there were 95,205 abortions in 1995. In
1996,
that number increased to 97,800, the highest of all metropolitan cities.)

>Again, the issue I am struggling with is one of consistency among the
>critics
>of Clinton and the traditional “liberal” platforms:
>1. Why would a party that seeks to keep government out of our lives
>want to
>use government to impose a prolife morality? What will the party that
>wants
>to reduce government invasion of our lives do about the corporate
>driven
>consumer culture that is permeating almost every fabric of human
>existence and
>creating the material causes for the eroding of basic values?

You bring up good points again, as in a previous “school choice”
discussion
but that is straying from the main issue of abortion. I have my own
criticisms
of both major political parties so I don’t feel obligated to defend their
particular inconsistencies.

>2. Why is there not the same anger directed at those who would pass
>policies
>which hurt the poor, racial minorities, immigrants, and single mothers
>disproportionately? (i.e., if we must balance the federal budget by
>making
>sacrifices, I’d like to see everyone making proportionate sacrifices).
> I
>remember when Reagan ran for office, he assured everyone that his
>”trickle
>down” theories would not cut off the safety net for the poorest.
>Contrast
>that with Bush-Clinton or Dole-Clinton! In the last two presidential
>elections, the poorest were the problem! They are the ones with
>cultural
>character flaws, without the work ethic, etc. Wouldn’t a consistent
>pro-life
>policy take these lives into consideration?

I agree that a consistent pro-life view would also advocate policies
of justice & compassion, especially for the “least of these.” Again, I
cannot defend the actions of previous officials nor speak for them. At
the same time, we cannot assume that the passionate pro-life
defenders of the unborn do not also advocate policies of mercy for
the racial minorities, the poor & the sick. There are many
believers who do not fit neatly into either “political package.”

> In an issue of CT
>several months ago which traced the career of Francis Schaeffer, it
>became
>clear that an evangelical consensus on the prolife and family values
>agenda
>was not reached (and there is probably not one today) in the 1970s.
>Not until
>late in Schaeffer’s life did the abortion issue suddenly become THE
>single issue.

I remember reading Schaeffer’s _How Then Shall We Live?_ about
10 years ago. I don’t remember all the details but I do recall how he
emphasized the links between abortion, infanticide, & euthanasia.
Schaeffer painted a prophetic picture of the moral slippery slope
that America faces today.

A critical foundational belief lies with an individual’s & society’s
views
of the sacredness of human life. If human life (from conception to
natural
death) has great worth as viewed by God, then society needs to take
steps to prevent the taking of that life by abortion. Once society can
arbitrarily end the lives of the unborn, then those “imperfect” babies
with
congenital defects or other mental/physical disabilities are next. Hence,

the present increasing prevalence of sex-selection and “defective baby”
abortions & infanticides. If in society’s “wisdom” it is best to end the
infant
lives of the imperfect or unwanted then aren’t the elderly also “useless”

and “unwanted?” Euthanasia would “serve” a purpose by helping to save
scarce health care resources & also “help” to end the suffering of the
elderly.

Human life has been further devalued ever since the abortion-on-
demand mentality became popularized. Too often do we read about
another baby being killed immediately after birth by his/her parent.
“If children can be so easily & legally aborted then why not kill them
after birth?” an overwhelmed teenaged mother might think. “If babies
can be thrown away, then why not throw away the old & chronically sick?”
pro-euthanasia advocates might think. Pushing this mentality to the
extreme, then why even have policies of compassion for poor, the
minorities, & the disadvantaged? America is getting further & further
down this “slippery slope.” A major crack started with abortions & the
eventual societal dismantling of the biblical view of the sanctity of
human life.

Perhaps that is one reason why many pro-life believers see the
abortion issue as being so critical to the moral underpinning of this
nation. Many advocates speak & fight for issues of a political/philo-
sophical/cultural nature which involve issues of discrimination,
injustice,
suffering, unfair sacrifices, abuse, etc. which are all wrong. However,
the
abortion issue is unique in that it is an issue of life & death for those
who CANNOT speak for themselves. And if concerned believers don’t
speak for the unborn, who will?

>So I continue to contend that our generation of Chinese American
>Christians
>must learn discernment and develop the ability to distinguish between
>rhetoric
>and reality. We need to better exegete the (sub)culture of those to
>whom God
>has called us to minister. Sze-kar calls it “self-determination” –
>and I
>agree with him. – Tim

I also agree. Wise discerning biblical contextualization (if I interpret
your
statements correctly) needs to occur, regardless of political persuasion,
to increase one’s ministry effectiveness.

Some believers do have a burden to minister in this pro-life arena.. It
is
at times hard & lonely. But to the believer, obedience to the Lord is
central.
In the final analysis, the imperfections & inconsistencies of a
particular
political party/church, political/religous leader, or political
policy/theological
interpretation should not and does not negate the truth that “Abortion
stops
a beating heart” and that believers have a responsibility to help save
those
young, innocent, helpless lives.

In Him,
J. Chang

——————————

From: Rlfong
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 1997 04:09:42 EST
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Chinese-American Demographics

In a message dated 97-12-07 04:03:44 EST, JLoFEC@AOL.COM writes:

<>

by this comment, do you mean ABC ministries are under-represented in the
effort?

Ronnie Fong
Fremont, CA

——————————

From: JLoFEC@aol.com
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 1997 15:51:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Chinese-American Demographics

Rlfong@aol.com wrote,

<>

>>by this comment, do you mean ABC ministries are under-represented in the
effort?

yes. that’s what i meant.

john

——————————

From: gdot@juno.com (G Ottoson)
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 1997 14:35:49 -0700
Subject: CAC_Mail: FYI–g

<>

——————————

From: “DJ Chuang”
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 1997 21:53:26 -0500
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: going beyond Chinese boundaries

re: Ken Fong’s list of AsAm churches

Great list to post on CAC! Thank you! Of course I’ll be adding the ones
I don’t have to my personal web site indexing the same, Index of Asian
American Ministries, at http://members.aol.com/djchuang/asian.htm

I would add notably CACer Steven Wong who is
church planting a new AsAm church in Northern Cal, San Jose/ Los Altos
area, now called Grace Community Church, affiliated with Ev.Covenant.

And secondly, the church I am on staff with, Ambassador Bible Church,
in Falls Church VA (metro Washington DC area),
http://www.tidalwave.net/~rchang/ , which is affiliated with Ev.Free,
and touts as a multiethnic church.

DJ

On 6 Dec 97 at 23:12, Ken Fong wrote:

> Here’s what I know as far as multi-Asian or multi-Asian/ethnic
> churches in the U.S. right now:
> Evergreen Baptist-of the San Gabriel Valley/ABC-USA
> Berkeley Christian Laymen Church
> Sturge Presbyterian Church, San Mateo, CA/PC
> Asian American (?) Church, outside of Dallas + w/SBC
> Newsong Community Church, Irvine, CA/independent
> Parkwood Community Church, outside of Chicago, IL/independent
> Cornerstone Community Church, east Seattle, WA/roots in ABC/USA
> Cornerstone Community Church, Cerritos, CA/independent?
> Gateway Christian Church, Walnut, CA/ABC-USA
> Sacramento Asian American Ministries (SAAM), Sacto, CA/ABC-USA
– —
*

——————————

From: David Wong
Date: Sun, 07 Dec 1997 23:55:41 -0500
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: going beyond Chinese boundaries

DJ Chuang wrote:
>
> re: Ken Fong’s list of AsAm churches
>
> Great list to post on CAC! Thank you! Of course I’ll be adding the ones
> I don’t have to my personal web site indexing the same, Index of Asian
> American Ministries, at http://members.aol.com/djchuang/asian.htm
>
> I would add notably CACer Steven Wong who is
> church planting a new AsAm church in Northern Cal, San Jose/ Los Altos
> area, now called Grace Community Church, affiliated with Ev.Covenant.
>
> And secondly, the church I am on staff with, Ambassador Bible Church,
> in Falls Church VA (metro Washington DC area),
> http://www.tidalwave.net/~rchang/ , which is affiliated with Ev.Free,
> and touts as a multiethnic church.
>
> DJ
>
> On 6 Dec 97 at 23:12, Ken Fong wrote:
>
> > Here’s what I know as far as multi-Asian or multi-Asian/ethnic
> > churches in the U.S. right now:
> > Evergreen Baptist-of the San Gabriel Valley/ABC-USA
> > Berkeley Christian Laymen Church
> > Sturge Presbyterian Church, San Mateo, CA/PC
> > Asian American (?) Church, outside of Dallas + w/SBC
> > Newsong Community Church, Irvine, CA/independent
> > Parkwood Community Church, outside of Chicago, IL/independent
> > Cornerstone Community Church, east Seattle, WA/roots in ABC/USA
> > Cornerstone Community Church, Cerritos, CA/independent?
> > Gateway Christian Church, Walnut, CA/ABC-USA
> > Sacramento Asian American Ministries (SAAM), Sacto, CA/ABC-USA
> —
> *

Hello to friends who hailed from the SF area – Brian Owyoung, Joe Wong
(CDI), Ron Fong….

I am David Wong, just turned 50. I went to Golden Gate Baptist
Theological Seminary in Mill Valley, CA and shepherded the English
congregation at Cumberland Presbyterian Chinese Church in Chinatown, SF
in the mid-70’s.

In 1978, I went to Wheaton, IL under the Christian and Missionary
Alliance to plant a church from scratch. Initially, I intended it to be
purely English speaking, but as Mandarin speaking parents came, I
decided they too need the gospel, so I reluctantly included a
Mandarin-speaking interpreter. I preached in English. The church grew.

It was fun to do church planting. I did my D.Min at Trinity and wrote my
project on “How to plant a Chinese Church in North America.” At the
time, there were few resources on church planting – now they are
everywhere and well written. I taught a few courses on Planting Chinese
Churches in North America at Alliance Theological Seminary in Nyack, NY
while pastoring the Wheaton Chinese Alliance Church.

The Wheaton Church is known as an English speaking church, with the
board members being ABC’s or english speaking in the majority. The
current pastor is from Taiwan who went to Wheaton Graduate School.

After Wheaton, We went to Gaithersburg, Maryland to start our second
church plant in 1985.Again a bilengual service. Today, the church has
two services, as is the church in Wheaton. It takes time to develop a
harmonious relationship in the congregation. Then dividing into two
worship services is no problem. They KEY lies with the pastoral
leadership.

I was born and raised in the Philippines and came to the US in 1971. I
speak four Chinese dialects, but English is my major language. My wife
is American from Tennessee. We have two kids. We were denied a position
with a Chinese church in Texas because a church leader said we, being a
cross-cultural marriage, will prove to be a BAD example for the Chinese
kids. I have no regrets, but thank God because that experience prompted
us to do church planting – where we don’t have to deal with bigotry or
bad leadership. This happened 20 years ago.

In 1991, we began our third church plant – in Georgetown, Washington DC.
We intended it to be international in scope. I believe churches will go
beyond race, as in Asian church or Latino church, to be global or
international. I have two tent-making Associate Pastors. One, an anglo
American, and the other, Hispanic, from Cali, Columbia.

God has blessed the work here the past six years. Worship service is in
English. People from 82 different countries and territories have at one
time or another worshipped with us. This place is very transitional, but
we see ourselves as winning and training internationals to go home and
reach their own people. A Chinese Bible study group we started has now
developed into a church of 40. Last Sunday, we started our first
Hispanic Fellowship, with the intend that two or three years from now,
it will develop into a church.

I hesitate to jump into the CAC discussion. I feel that AA is a
disservice to minorities, specially African-Americans who were fed a
line by the likes of Jesse Jackson or the black elites, that they
deserve something for the sufferings of their forebears. I agree more
with the views of Harry Lew. Let’s just lay aside the discussion for AA
for now. Have you not had enough?

Our website is http://www.internationalchurch.org Please visit or write.

Regards,
David Wong
Senior Pastor
Washington International Church
P. O. Box 3634
Washington, DC 20007
(202) 298-6110
pastor@internationalchurch.org

——————————

From: ohbrudder
Date: Mon, 08 Dec 1997 02:01:01 -0800
Subject: CAC_Mail: Winning Edge

Borrowing the title from Bill Walsh’s (greatest football coach of all
time)
new book, FINDING THE WINNING EDGE, I offer the following edge
to winning ABCs for Christ.

1. Praying for a specific plan. What works for one church most likely
does not work for another . . .God does not want us to rely
on a plan or method but on Him. Just look at the myriad of
methods God used in Scripture: sling shot, 10 plagues,
march seven times around Jericho, dip seven times in Jordan,
spit and mud to heal, etc. How many times did God repeat a
method?

2. Multi-generational church generally more effective than a
multi-ethnic church for reaching ABCs. In the business
world, the best, most profitable companies have a niche.
No company or church can be all things to all people.
Providing ministries for all ages in the family is tough
enough, and
certainly one of the keys to reaching the “unsaved 90%” is to
reach the ABC and family (can involve 3 generations).
Many situations have the parents going to one church and
children going to another.

[Churches like Evergreen, multi-ethnic, is unique. Again, I
point to her as an example of God’s specific plan for a
church rather than a pattern for all to imitate. Ken disagrees.]

3. Use what God gives you rather than try to be something God did not
give you. If God made you a “cow,” you can guess your
ministry is to be a “steak” or “hamburger.” How’s that for a
metaphorical illustration? So it helps to know the spiritual
gifts and personalities and talents, etc in the church.
It is no accident the church has what it has . . .
because Jesus said, ” I will build my church. . .” and He
equips us.

I believe a Chinese church is blessed if she has a strong
OBC pastor who is secure in who he is and can support an
ABC minister and ministry without reservation. In my past,
any success we had was made possible by the support of
the OBC pastor and thus the support of the OBC congregation.

4. Receive from God His passion and compassion for ABCs, driven by a
vision, empowered by the Spirit, conviction of your message.
And have a core of believers with a like mind and spirit.

bill leong

——————————

From: ohbrudder
Date: Mon, 08 Dec 1997 02:07:20 -0800
Subject: CAC_Mail: ABCs cursed?

Are the ABC’s cursed?
If not, it feels as if we are. Over 25 years in the ministry, I’ve seen
comparatively little progress in reaching our 2nd, 3rd, etc generations
for Christ. Many gifted ABC leaders with great potentials have fallen
and come and gone, planting a lot of seeds without much increase.
Many ABC seminarians can’t get positions or turned down in large
percentages by Chinese churches.

Chinese churches have great difficulties in dealing with ABCs . . .
volumes written on that . . . and white churches make no special
efforts to reach us and draws maybe a hand full.

ABCs are in numbers disproportionately greater than other minorities
in American universities but woefully disproportionately smaller in
churches. I did a survey while in seminary in the mid-70’s of the
LA area . . .called every known Chinese church listed in the yellow
pages . . .bottom line: estimated 1%
of total Chinese population . . .okay if one looks at it sideways,
stretch this and that, maybe 2%. But what difference does it make
if 90% or 99% of our generation is going to hell? It’s still a
grave tragedy happening before our eyes.

We, the “remnant” God has saved are the hope of our bros’ (and sis’).
The enemy is winning this one . . .right now. I agree with John that
whatever solution or plan, prayer must be a prominent part . . .
and I add not just with the words of prayer but tears, tears, and
more tears to be sown to reap with joy. May God move us with
compassion and call us to this warfare that can be won only
thru prayer.

bill leong

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Mon, 08 Dec 1997 23:12:02 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Winning Edge

> [Churches like Evergreen, multi-ethnic, is unique. Again, I
> point to her as an example of God’s specific plan for a
> church rather than a pattern for all to imitate. Ken disagrees.]
>

Actually, I never said (I don’t think) that all our churches should use the
same model, whether it’s multi-ethnic or otherwise. I am an advocate of
multiple models for many of the same reasons listed by bill leong. I only
described what’s happening here at EBC.LA so others would know what else is
possible given the right conditions.

ken fong.

——————————

From: JWongCDI@aol.com
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 1997 02:58:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject: CAC_Mail: Nice report

Ken;
That was a great summation/report of your church:
I am excited for you; the exhilartion and the adventure His Spirit is taking
Evergreen into. This is an opportunity, in having freedom from traditional
patterns, to explore for God’s wisdom and will.

It may be a “proto-type” church for the 21st Century, but not THE proto-type.
I suspect many types will still flourish.
I hope that in the 21st century, you can do an analysis of the strengths and
the lacks found in your proto-type when compared with more traditional types.
Perhaps the existence of many different types of churches, will enable us to
better discern the qualities in the original design for His church.

Meanwhile, May our Lord grant you a great adventure and experience!

My wish for a wonderful holiday season to you CACers.

Joe

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Tue, 09 Dec 1997 00:04:52 -0800
Subject: CAC_Mail: Re: Nice report

thanks, Joe. If you noticed, I was careful to say “a” prototype. Far
be it from me to be so grandiose!

onward and upward! ken.

——————————

From: jtc10@juno.com (J Chang)
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 1997 19:07:30 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: Crisis Pregnancy Centers

Dear Louis:

On Fri, 5 Dec 1997 16:43:21 EST AsianPK writes:

>I have had the privilege of being involved with our local Crisis
>Pregnancy Center for the past 10 years, the past 5 years serving
>on their Board of Directors.

>For the first 7-8 years of my pastoral ministry I had pretty much
>ignored the abortion issue dismissing it as a “political issue.” I
>thank God for a dedicated Asian American Christian pro life doctor
>in this area who was persistent in helping me to better understand
>what a serious moral issue abortion really is.

Thanks again for your encouragement! I have also been involved
in a local crisis pregnancy center (CPC) in the NYC area. I served
as president on the Board of Directors for 5 years. We have both
probably seen how CPCs can be very effective ministries in the
front lines of providing women alternatives to abortion.

When I was a volunteer male counselor in a Chicago CPC, God gave
significant openings for ministry to male & female clients in crisis
pregnancy situations. Clients from various backgrounds (H.S. drop-out,
gang member, unemployed, single parent, minorities, non-believers
AND believers) came because someone cared & shared with support
spiritually, emotionally, & practically (free pregnancy testing, baby
clothes,
maternity clothes, etc.) In one year, the CPC in Chicago had 174 women
who carried their pregnancies to term & 24 women who committed their
lives to Christ. That’s 174 babies saved from physical death & 24 souls
saved from spiritual death! This type of ministry really works as it
reaches
into the community where churches don’t normally reach.

Not many people know about it, but day in, day out, crisis pregnancy
centers
across the nation (over 4,000) are quietly touching the lives of children
&
women in ways we may not be able to measure eternally. The irony is that
many believers, pastors, & churches may not even be aware of the CPCs.
Many
of those CPCs are small centers operating on shoe-string budgets helped
by the faithful financial support of a few believers, giving averages of
$15-$25
each. Meanwhile, compare that with Planned Parenthood, the nation’s top
abortion
provider, which receives millions in contributions every year, (What’s
wrong with
this picture?) & many of which come from huge familiar corporate entities

(issues of discernment in spending/selective boycotts/consumer
responsibility &
biblical stewardship of resources pops up here, but maybe to be addressed

another time).

Anyway, I was wondering if you could share a little about the journey of
how
you gradually became convinced that abortion was a serious moral issue.
How did your dedicated Asian American Christian pro life doctor friend
persuade you to eventually get involved in a tangible way? How has your
center
in CA been used by God to minister to those in crisis? What have been
some
ways this issue has been/could be addressed in the pastoral ministry?

In Him,
J. Chang

——————————

From: TSTseng
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 1997 23:01:07 EST
Subject: CAC_Mail: Fwd: AAASCommunity: My America Screenings Available–Nationwide

CACers:

Been reduced to lurking lately – too many writing assignments to complete.
But I wanted to forward to you info about the following film – it’s excellent
(and not really about Buddhism). – Tim

– ————————————————————
Rev. Dr. Timothy Tseng
Sallie Knowles Crozer Assistant Professor of American Religious History
Colgate-Rochester Divinity School
1100 South Goodman Street
Rochester, NY 14620
OFF: (716) 271-1320, ext. 260
FAX: (716) 271-8013
Email: tstseng@aol.com
– ————————————————————

From: Tajimapena
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 1997 21:15:46 EST
To: aaasposts@uclink4.berkeley.edu
Subject: AAASCommunity: AAASPosts: My America Screenings Available–Nationwide

==================================================================
* This is email from the News & Announcements list (AAASPosts) of
* the Email Network of the Association for Asian American Studies.
– —————————————————————–
* For more information about the list and the AAAS Email Network,
* email a request to .
– —————————————————————–
* For information about AAAS membership, email a request to
* our national office at .
==================================================================
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact Juli Kang or Lara Kaminsky
tel. (310) 479-2040, fax. (310) 477-2653,

“MY AMERICA…OR HONK IF YOU LOVE BUDDHA”
Sundance Film Festival Award Winner
1998 SCREENING DATES AVAILABLE

Beginning in January, 1998, filmmaker Renee Tajima-Peña will continue the
national road tour of MY AMERICA…OR HONK IF YOU LOVE BUDDHA, her rollicking
documentary in search of Asian America. If your school or group is interested
in sponsoring a screening while the filmmaker is in your area, please contact
Juli Kang or Lara Kaminsky for rates and scheduling.

SCREENING DATES:
January (date TBD) – University of California at Santa Barbara
January 29 – Spokane Falls Community College, Spokane, Washington
February 20 – Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
March (date TBD) – Macalaster College, Minneapolis, Minnesota
March 1 – Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
March 8 – Asian Pacific American Film Festival, San Francisco, California
April (date TBD) – Cal State Fullerton, Fullerton, California
April (date TBD) – Washington, D.C.

ABOUT THE FILM
In MY AMERICA…OR HONK IF YOU LOVE BUDDHA, producer/director Tajima-Peña
recalls her childhood travels in the 1960s and 70s, when her family would
drive for days and never see another Asian face. More than 20 years later,
Tajima-Peña hits the blacktop once again to explore with her own brand of wry
wit just how much the racial and cultural landscape of America has changed.
With Victor Wong (Joy Luck Club, The Last Emperor) as her “road guru,” Tajima-
Peña sets out to search for the new American identity that will arise from the
multi-culti hoi-palloi that is America at the end of the 20th century.

In New Orleans, the Burtanog sisters, eighth generation Louisianan Filipinas,
describe growing up as “honorary whites.” In Seattle, a pair of Korean
American rappers known as The Seoul Brothers adopt rap and hip-hop to express
the political awakening of a new generation. In Mississippi she films the
legendary activist Yuri Kochiyama and in Los Angeles, she meets a young
student named Alyssa Kang, who risks arrest fighting for immigrant rights.
Throughout her travels, Tajima-Peña pokes fun at the stereotypes that color
attitudes towards Asians with characters like Mr. Choi, a Chinatown fortune
cookie maker who is a veritable “Horatio Alger on amphetamines.”

MY AMERICA…OR HONK IF YOU LOVE BUDDHA is a rollicking ride across this
changing terrain.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT “MY AMERICA”

A movable feast, Asian American style
– Angelo Ragaza, Editor, A Magazine

Delightfully wry…
– Los Angeles Times

Slyly provocative, utterly intrepid.
– The Village Voice

Poignant and powerful, My America…packs an Oscar-caliber punch.
– Screen Source

Sharp and compelling…WONDERFUL!
– Los Angeles Weekly

Tajima weaves a rich tapestry of people and events, of memory and desire,
showing us the
continuities and discontinuities of Asian America across the decades. A must
not only for anyone interested in Asian American studies but also for all
students of American culture.
– Elaine Kim, Chair, Ethnic Studies Department, UC Berkeley

If Asian Americans have too often been cast as spectators in the drama of
black/white America, MY AMERICA restores their centrality.
– B. Ruby Rich, Sundance Film Festival

Educational, entertaining, and visually stunning, MY AMERICA captures the
complexities of Asian American lives–and the changing American racial
landscape– of the last four decades.
– Yen Le Espiritu, President, Association of Asian American Studies

What happens when the ideals of an earlier Asian American movement encounter
the new post-1965 Asian immigrants – in all their unexpected cultural,
economic, and political heterogeneity? MY AMERICA answers this question in a
witty, smart, and poignant film.
– Lisa Lowe, UC San Diego

MY AMERICA is a rare glimpse into what it means to be an Asian American &
multicultural today–with all its hopes, contradictions, humour and humanity.
– Russell Leong, Editor, Moving the Image

Loose and funny…People are talking about MY AMERICA.
– New York Daily News

MY AMERICA captures our hearts by giving us the soul of Asian Pacific America.
It is a remarkable film with universal appeal.
– Rockwell Chin, Dir., NYC Human Rights Commission

MY AMERICA is a great discussion starter. It interweaves history and current
events in a personalized format that is very moving for students (and their
teacher as well). I recommend it highly.
– Philip Tajitsu Nash, Univ. of Maryland

================================================================
* AAASCommunity, the Discussion & News list of the
* Email Network of the Association for Asian American Studies
– —————————————————————
* Coordinator:
================================================================

——————————

From: Ken Fong
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 1997 01:01:28 -0800
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Fwd: AAASCommunity: My America Screenings Available–Nationwide

I’ve seen “My America” twice and even spoke with the director, Renee.
Her late uncle was a JA Presby. pastor in LA many years ago and her
cousin is a Presby pastor, too, although she doesn’t claim to be a
believer. We got quite a number of our church folk to go. Since the
film touches on the struggles of Chinese-, Laotian-, Filipino-,
Japanese-, and Korean-Americans, it was quite helpful in bringing out
certain identity issues for these groups in our church community.

ken fong.

——————————

From: DC Chuang
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 1997 07:17:48 EST
Subject: Re: CAC_Mail: Re: Bill Lee and Affirmative Action

In a message dated 97-12-06 16:31:36 EST, you write:

<>

Hmmm, I haven’t really thought of this discussion as one between character and
competence. Can one honestly say that Clinton is more competent that George
Bush, who lead us through the Gulf War and Bob Dole, a Senator for 20 or so
odd years?

Besides do the majority of people vote based on competency? From everything
I’ve read, the answer is “no”. So if it is based on policy, what good is it
if you can’t trust the guy to keep his word and his behavior could be
clinically classified as anti-social.
Mind you this is not the result of a media smear campaign nor did it surface
under intense public scrutiny, Clinton demonstrates it himself, sometimes
daily. You just have to open your eyes. Now I ask again, how can someone who
is fully aware of this, in good conscience vote for such a person?

<>

Bad example, you’re not comparing apples to apples. It’s not his personal
life that is in question, it is whether he can be trusted to do *anything* he
says.

Still puzzled, DC

——————————

From: wkmoy@juno.com
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 1997 18:32:36 EST
Subject: CAC_Mail: FYI: AA article & API Census Bureau stats

CAC, Just wanted to share the info about what’s out there . . .

Our youth pastor was looking for SJ Mercury article dated Wed
12/10/97 about “Asian American Young found better educated” which
included stats based on Census Bureau figures from March 1996 Current
Pop Survey.

ARTICLE SUMMARY: Asian Americans living in this country tend to be
younger & better educated than other Americans. They are more likely to
live in cities and less likely to be divorced, Census Bureau figures
show. A profile of the nation’s 9,653,000 Asians & Pacific Islanders was
released by the bureau Tues, based on the Mar 96 Current Pop Survey. The
group represents about 3.7 percent of the pop.

Found old stats: http://www.census.gov/ Press-Release/cb95-99.txt.
Article titled “Stat Facts for API Heritage Month” 5/23/95

(Same Updated(?) article called “Asian & Pacific Islander Population” :
http://ww.census.gov/population/www/pop-profile/apipop.html

Peace, Wilbur
c/oCE Intern @ Sunset Chinese Baptist Church (415)665-5550
3635 Lawton St, San Francisco, CA 94122 FAX: 665-4575
e-mail: wkmoy@juno.com office: (415) 665-9749

——————————

From: DC Chuang
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 1997 20:09:29 EST
Subject: CAC_Mail: Some Statistics

Question is how much does the Christian population differ? What about Asian
Christians?
– ——————————————-
Some Statistics about us Americans. Did you know that…

* 91% of us lie regularly.
* 27% admit to cheating on a test or quiz.
* 29% admit they’ve intentionally stolen something from a
store.
* 90% believe in divine retribution.
* 10% believe in the 10 Commandments.
* 58.4% have called into work sick when we weren’t.
* 10% of us switch tags in the store to pay less for an
item.
* How far would you go for $10 million? 25% would abandon
their friends, family, and religion. 7% would murder.

——————————

From: “DJ Chuang”
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 1997 23:22:59 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: PNDAACs

Date sent: Wed, 10 Dec 1997 22:25:50 -0500 (EST)
***** Forwarded Message *****

From: The Yees
Subject: PNDAACs

Dear CACers –

My belated thanks also to Ken Fong for his list of intentionally
AsAm churches; and even more so for caring enough to stay abreast
of them. One minor correction: Chicago’s Parkwood Community Church’s
staff pastor is Greg YEE, not Wong (and is my esteemed brother in the
flesh, which is why I bother to note this!).

I’d like to offer a different list: PNDAACs in the mid/south Alameda
County area (on the east side of San Francisco Bay, between Oakland and
Silicon Valley). What are PNDAACs? Pretty New Dinky Asian American
Churches, one of which I pastor. Including only all-English speaking
churches not identified with only one ethnicity (Chinese, Japanese,
etc.), we have:

1989 East Bay Bible Church (Fremont)
Bill Jang, independent (45)
1991 Valley Gate Chapel (Pleasanton)
(open; formerly Kenton Jang), Southern Baptist (35)
1991 New Life Christian Fellowship (Castro Valley)
Russell Yee, American Baptist (40)
1992 Lord’s Community (Fremont),
Kevin Hom, Southern Baptist (30)
1993 Fremont Asian Christian Church
Joe Roberts, Holiness (65)
1997 Pathway Community Church (Castro Valley)
Brian Owyoung, Independent (20)

(My apologies for any omissions. I am of course interested to know
whether there are similar scatterings of PNDAACs in other parts of the
country.)

Question: Why so many small churches, and without even one large AsAm
church in the area I’m citing? (Christian Layman/The Lord’s Gate is
further north.) A few stabs:
– Churches are still young
– Short pastoral tenures; less than full-time pastorates
– Inadequate aptitude/training/drive to cultivate “rancher” skills
– Low risk-tolerance – Lack of models and mentoring
– Too many divisions over relatively minor points of doctrine &
practice
– Turf
– “Asian American” still not a mature concept in the Bay Area
(surprisingly–I think there’s still a lot of identification with
Chinese, Japanese, etc.)

– Lay leaders just too stressed out by two-career, long-commute,
kids-in-soccer lifestyles to rise up
– Hard to get land/worship space
– ?

Whaddaya all think? Any advice from the “big boys?”

Russell Yee <- wondering what it all means

——————————

From: "DJ Chuang"
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 1997 23:35:54 -0500
Subject: CAC_Mail: closed chapter

CACers,

Thanks for your recent interaction on political issues, especially
those who remained civil and cordial during the discourse, and thanks
also to those who were patient to remain subscribed amidst some moments
which might be perceived heated.

Please now close the chapter on affirmative action, and presidential
perceptions. Let’s move on to the topic at hand re: Asian American
churches.

DJ Chuang, CAC list manager

p.s. note of clarification- DJ Chuang, list manager, and DC Chuang, a
CACer, are different persons, though we are related; I’m the older
brother
– —
*

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