Posts in March 1997 a

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 01:05:03 -0500 (EST)
From: TSTseng@aol.com
Subject: Re: CAC List Mail: Exit Interviews

Great to hear from you, Bro. Ken!

Indeed, that text is what got me interested in exploring the “exit interview”
phenomena among Chinese Americans. I’m still interested in hearing the
stories of those who have either given up the faith or left the Chinese
church for a “mainstream” congregation/ministry.

All the best!

Tim Tseng

In a message dated 3/14/97 2:03:38 AM, kenfong@earthlink.net (Ken Fong)
wrote:

<>

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 1997 23:32:57 -0800
From: Ken Fong
Subject: Re: CAC List Mail: Exit Interviews

Brother Tim:

Might want to cross-check your Chinese sources with “Exit Interviews:
Revealing Stories of Why People Are Leaving the Church”, Wm. D.
Hendricks, Moody:1993

Be interesting to see if there’s any correlation.

Peace, Ken.

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: 11 Mar 97 23:14:21 EST
From: BB
Subject: CAC List Mail: Partial Birth Abortions

Dear Fellow Concerned Asian Believers:

FYI–

J. Chang

————————————————————–

This press release was sent out late this morning. If you have
any questions or comments about this press release or about the
Family Research Council, please visit our web site at:

http://www.frc.org

————————————————————-

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Mar. 11, 1997
CONTACT: Kristi S. Hamrick, (202) 393-2100
FOR RADIO: Kristin Hansen,
FOR SOUNDBITES: Direct Newsline, (202) 393-6397

THE TRUTH ABOUT PARTIAL-BIRTH ABORTIONS:

END ERA OF INFANTICIDE ON DEMAND,
PROTECT WOMEN’S HEALTH AND
FERTILITY, FRC SAYS

WASHINGTON, D.C. — “As a greater consensus is quickly
building against partial-birth abortions, there is one key
truth upon which any pro-life or pro-choice legislator voting
for the ban can stand,” Family Research Council President
Gary Bauer said Tuesday. “To truly preserve and uphold the
health of the mother, the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban must be
passed, and it must NOT contain the word health.”

Bauer made his comments as a joint hearing took place in the
Senate Judiciary Committee and the House Judiciary
Constitution Subcommittee to investigate the facts of
partial-birth abortion, including the circumstances, frequency,
timing, and method.

BAN PRESERVES WOMEN’S HEALTH AS PRECIOUS

“The Partial-Birth Abortion Ban seeks to preserve not only the
baby’s life but also the life and health of the mother,” Bauer
continued. “Research shows that the procedure at hand
severely threatens, not preserves, a woman’s future health and
fertility. Take a look at the very women who stood with
President Clinton to veto the ban. Here are just a couple of
the physical dangers, not to mention the emotional,
psychological, and spiritual impact on a woman’s life:”

— “…one of the five women at Clinton’s veto ceremony had
five miscarriages after her intact D & E.” In addition, “the
procedure risks creating an ‘incompetent cervix,’ which could
prevent a woman from carrying future pregnancies to term” or
force her to lie flat the majority of her pregnancy.

— American Medical News (Mar. 3, 1997)

WITH HEALTH LANGUAGE, NO HEALTH PROTECTED,
NO LIFE PRESERVED

“The Supreme Court, in Doe v. Bolton, defined the word health
so broadly that ALL abortions were made legal through the
ninth month for any reason whatsoever even for sex-selection,”
Bauer said. “Abortion advocates are only looking out for the
‘health’ of the abortion industry, not of the women.

“Upon these truths and other evidence documented today,
Congress must stand up and finally put an end to the era of
infanticide on demand — if they’re truly for women and
children.”

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 12:47:30 -0500 (EST)
From: TSTseng@aol.com
Subject: CAC List Mail: Exit Interviews

For my research, I’m looking for persons raised in or involved with North
American Chinese Protestant churches who have since left the Christian faith
or have stopped becoming involved with Chinese church life (though not
necessarily the wider Church itself). I’d like to hear the reasons why these
persons decided to leave Chinese congregations and their thoughts/opinions
about Chinese Christianity in America. Feel free to respond on this list or
email me privately at: tstseng@aol.com.

Thanks!

Timothy Tseng

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 1997 12:47:32 -0500 (EST)
From: TSTseng@aol.com
Subject: CAC List Mail: Fwd: AAAS List (racial violence)

New York Area CACers:
This if FYI, Tim Tseng

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
TO MOBILIZE THE ASIAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY
IN PREPARATION FOR:
———————————————

(1) Vigil in Memory of YongXin Huang

On Sunday, March 23, 1-4pm at Columbus Park
in NYC’s Chinatown (Bayard & Baxter), we will
hold a vigil in memory of YongXin Huang, a
16-year-old who was shot in the back of the
head by NY Police Officer Steve Mizrahi.
Despite evidence that shows YongXin Huang did
not resist arrest, the Brooklyn DA has failed
to indict Mizrahi for the killing and he
still serves on the police force.

(2) Racial Justice Day

On Monday, March 31, 1997, 5:00 PM at City
Hall, NYC, there will rally against racial
violence and police brutality. The rally is
sponsored by the National Congress for Puerto
Rican Rights, Alianza Dominicana, Almighty
Latin King & Queen Nation, Association of
Pro-Inmates Rights, Azabache, Center for
Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, the
Committee Against Anti-Asian Violence, Jews
for Racial & Economic Justice, Malcolm X
Grassroots Movement, Muevete, National Action
Network, Parents Against Police Brutality,
Positive Workforce, Student Power Movement,
Youth Agenda, Youth Force, Workers World
Party.

———————————————

On Friday, March 14, the Committee Against
Anti-Asian Violence will be holding a meeting
for those interested in helping to prepare
for these events. Please meet us at 6:30 in
the NYU Loeb Student Center, 566 LaGuardia at
Washington Square South, Rooms 515 & 517.

If you have any questions, contact CAAAV at
(212) 473-6485 or caaav@dti.net

———————————————

Please join us in the fight against
anti-Asian violence and police brutality

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
From: Ben Han
Subject: CAC List Mail: CAC Forum
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 1997 14:16:39 -0500

I would like to subscribe to the CAC Forum. My e-mail is ben@mccc.org

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 1997 12:00:07 -0600
From: “Jeanette S.G. Yep”
Subject: CAC List Mail: pastoral needs

Hi friends!

Here’s another staff position opening, fyi.

Jeanette Yep

>Return-Path: <
>Comments: Authenticated sender is <
>From: “Scott Cho” <
>Date: Thu, 13 Feb 1997 10:37:01 CST6CDT
>Subject: pastoral needs
>
>Dear friends,
>
>For those of you who don’t know me, my name is Scott Cho. I am
>a memeber of Hanmee Church in Itasca, IL. I am sending you this
>message because I (or someone else) thought you may have some
>insight to someone who may be interested in a position at
>Hanmee’s English Ministry. Please foward this message to anyone
>you may know who may have contacts or be interested. Below is a
>blurb that we intend to put on a future issue of Christianity
>Today.
>
>Thank you for your help and consideration.
>
>In His service,
>
>Scott Cho
>scott.cho@wheaton.edu
>
>———-
>Hanmee Presbyterian Church a Korean-American congregation located
>in Itasca, IL (suburb of Chicago) is seeking a full-time pastor
>of English Ministry. The responsibilities include ministering to
>the Adult English-speaking congregation and overseeing the other
>congregations of the English ministry, which include children and
>youth. Hanmee is one of the oldest and largest Korean-American
>churches in the Chicagoland area. Every Sunday, we hold 5
>services (2 in Korean, 3 in English). The new pastor will work
>in conjunction with the senior pastor to develop and advance the
>church’s English ministry with the hopes that one day it will be
>able to sustain itself spiritually, administrationally and
>financially. The ideal candidate will be an experienced,
>ordained pastor familiar with the Korean culture. For more
>information, please contact Scott Cho (630) 545-9004 or
>scott.cho@wheaton.edu.
>
>

Jeanette S.G. Yep
IVCF (InterVarsity Christian Fellowship)
P.O. Box 1400
Downers Grove, IL 60515
630/887-2510, ext. 280
630/887-2520 fax
jyep@nwu.edu

0000,0000,ffff*** If you need to get in
touch with me immediately, please call. Usually, I check e-mail daily, in
the late afternoon, monday-friday, and once during the weekend.
***

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
From: “DJ Chuang”
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 1997 09:27:17 +0000
Subject: CAC List Mail: about CAC (correction)

[This contains corrected version of the monthly posting; * marks What’s New]

FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about CAC (5 Mar 97)

Q: What is this CAC mailing list?
A: The CAC Forum is an informal “mailing list” online discussion for Chinese
American Christians, where we discuss many issues related to (but not limited
to) Chinese American Christians, including campus ministry and ethnic church
issues, as well as some political issues concerning Asian Americans. As an
informal forum, you may also share ministry opportunities and prayer requests
accordingly.

Q: How many subscribers are there on CAC?
A: Currently we have more than 170 ministry leaders and laypersons. Please
forward this message to others who may be interested in the CAC forum.

*Q: How do you post a message to the CAC forum?
A: Send an email message to “cac@bccn.org” [without quotes], and a copy of
your message will be sent to all CAC subscribers.

Q: How do you unsubscribe (stop receiving CAC messages)?
A: Send an email message to “listserver@bccn.org” and on the first line of the
message body, write “unsubscribe cac” [without quotes].

Q: How do you subscribe to CAC (start receiving CAC messages)?
A: Send an email message to “listserver@bccn.org” and on the first line of the
message body, write “subscribe cac your_name” [without quotes]. Put your first
and last name in the place of your_name. You’ll receive a confirmation/
welcome message to say you’re a new subscriber.

*Q: Is there an archive of old CAC messages?
A: There is an archive of selected CAC messages and posted articles at the
CAC web page or
.

Q: I’m only interested in some of the topics. What can I do?
A: As the list has grown, almost tripled in size within the past year, there
has been an increasing diversity of discussions and interests. If you would
like a more focused discussion group / mailing list, please write to DJ Chuang
and I can start a new one.

Q: What does CAC stand for?
A: CAC is Chinese American Christians. Although the scope of discussions
often discuss Asian American issues and sometimes generic topics, the name
stuck because of its origins.

Q: How does a “mailing list” work?
A: CAC is run by an automated computer program, called a “listserver”, which
send copies of email messages to all CAC subscribers.

Q: Why was CAC started and automated?
A: The list was started in 1995 by Drs. Timothy Tseng and Sze-Kar Wan. CAC
used to be a manually propagated carbon copy email, but was automated in
summer of 1996. We hope to bring Chinese American Christians together using
the latest technology so that we can share our ideas and resources on
furthering the cause of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in North America and around
the world. We hope that this CAC forum will serve as a “think tank” and/or a
networking vehicle for all of us.

Q: Is there a moderator for CAC?
A: DJ Chuang is the list manager.

-end-

“It doesn’t count if it goes unsaid.” *

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 1997 00:39:54 -0500 (EST)
From: TSTseng@aol.com
Subject: CAC List Mail: Fwd 9: AAAS List

FYI, Tim Tseng

ASIAN AMERICANS:
SICK OF WELFARE ‘REFORM’ AND THE SCAPEGOATING OF IMMIGRANTS AND THE POOR???

CALL IN `SICK` ON MARCH 18TH and GET ON THE BUS…
FROM SF’s CHINATOWN AND JOIN HUNDREDS OF IMMIGRANTS
AND LABOR, RELIGIOUS AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE ADVOCATES & ACTIVISTS
for IMMIGRANT LOBBY DAY IN SACRAMENTO…

*learn about the devastating impact of welfare ‘reform,’
*develop your lobbying and legislative skills, and
*unite with grassroots community-based organizations
and the movement for immigrant rights and empowerment!

The Northern California Coalition for Immigrant Rights and Mujeres
Unidas y Activas in conjunction with a broad coalition including:
the Chinese Progressive Association, CA Latino Civil Rights Network,
Community Tenants Association, On Lok, Coalition for Ethical Welfare Reform,
Political Ecology Group, SF Day Laborer Program, Center for Third World
Organizing, Comite de Padres Unidos and the
Immigrant Rights Action Coalition
invite you to a Sacramento lobbying/protest day to reverse
the worst of the immigration/welfare cuts – Tuesday, March 18.

Join hundreds of immigrants, labor, religious and welfare advocates
throughout Northern California for an important day of legislative visits
and visibility as Sacramento tackles welfare ‘reform’. The action coincides
with the one-year anniversary of the 1996 Hunger Strike for Immigrant Rights
at the San Francisco Federal Building which brought together many of the
organizations, activists and community folks who are organizing this
important action.
Everyone is urged to “Call in sick, if you are sick of welfare
‘reform'”, and come be part of the 18th. The day will include a legislative
briefing, lobbying sessions and a noontime rally.
Buses will at leave at 8 am from SF Chinatown at the Geen Mun
Neighborhood Center at 777 Stockton St. (@ Sacramento St. near the Stockton
St. Tunnel), from the SF Mission District at Centro del Pueblo at 474
Valencia St. (btwn 15th and 16th Sts.), and at 10 am from Oakland’s
Fruitvale BART station. GET ON THE BUS! There’s no charge. To reserve a
seat, call 243-9286 x354.
Legislative briefings are scheduled in SF for those interested in
lobbying the legislators:
-Spanish language: Thur March 13, 10-1, site to be determined
-Cantonese/Mandarin: Wed March 12, 2-4, Bayside Housing, 777 Broadway
-Vietnamese: Sat March 15, 1-3 pm, 375 Eddy at Jones
-English: in Sacramento, March 18, 9-11 am.

Note: this day was formerly scheduled for March 13 but has been
rescheduled so we can join forces with a March for Justice and Dignity for
Sacramento’s
Working Poor, organized by progressive labor forces such as Justice for
Janitors.
The next meeting of the coalition organizing the day of events is
Tuesday night, March 4 at 6 pm at NCCIR, 995 Market Street at 6th, 11th
floor, San Francisco.

For more info: call the Nor. Cal. Coalition for Immigrant Rights
at (415)243-9286 x354; or
the Chinese Progressive Association
at (415) 391-6986.

Thanks.
Eric Mar
APIFORCE (Asians & Pacific Islanders for Community Empowerment)
(415) 995-4903 or (408) 345-2320
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
Eric Mar
New College of California
School of Law
50 Fell Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
(415) 241-1352 or
(800) 335-6262 x352
EMAIL: emar@ncgate.newcollege.edu
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

FORWARD EVER, BACKWARD NEVER!

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
From: “DJ Chuang”
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 1997 11:01:33 +0000
Subject: CAC List Mail: about CAC

[This will be a monthly posting to remind you that you are a subscriber on
the CAC Forum. ]

FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about CAC (Mar 97)

Q: What is this CAC mailing list?
A: The CAC Forum is an informal “mailing list” online discussion for Chinese
American Christians, where we discuss many issues related to (but not limited
to) Chinese American Christians, including campus ministry and ethnic church
issues, as well as some political issues concerning Asian Americans. As an
informal forum, you may also share ministry opportunities and prayer requests
accordingly.

Q: How many subscribers are there on CAC?
A: Currently we have more than 170 ministry leaders and laypersons. Please
forward this message to others who may be interested in the CAC forum.

Q: How do you unsubscribe (stop receiving CAC messages)?
A: Send an email message to “listserver@bccn.org” and on the first line of the
message body, write “unsubscribe cac” [without quotes].

Q: How do you subscribe to CAC (start receiving CAC messages)?
A: Send an email message to “listserver@bccn.org” and on the first line of the
message body, write “subscribe cac your_name” [without quotes]. Put your first
and last name in the place of your_name. You’ll receive a confirmation/
welcome message to say you’re a new subscriber.

Q: Is there an archive of old CAC messages?
A: There is an archive of selected CAC messages and posted articles at the CAC
web page or
.

Q: I’m only interested in some of the topics. What can I do?
A: As the list has grown, almost tripled in size within the past year, there
has been an increasing diversity of discussions and interests. If you would
like a more focused discussion group / mailing list, please write to DJ Chuang
and I can start a new one.

Q: What does CAC stand for?
A: CAC is Chinese American Christians. Although the scope of discussions
often discuss Asian American issues and sometimes generic topics, the name
stuck because of its origins.

Q: How does a “mailing list” work?
A: CAC is run by an automated computer program, called a “listserver”, which
send copies of email messages to all CAC subscribers.

Q: Why was CAC started and automated?
A: The list was started in 1995 by Drs. Timothy Tseng and Sze-Kar Wan. CAC
used to be a manually propagated carbon copy email, but was automated in
summer of 1996. We hope to bring Chinese American Christians together using
the latest technology so that we can share our ideas and resources on
furthering the cause of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in North America and around
the world. We hope that this CAC forum will serve as a “think tank” and/or a
networking vehicle for all of us.

Q: Is there a moderator for CAC?
A: That would be me, DJ Chuang , the list manager.

-end-

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 1997 13:06:15 -0500 (EST)
From: TSTseng@aol.com
Subject: CAC List Mail: Re: Japanese American interment

Hi Mike,

In a message dated 3/2/97 4:39:18 PM, you wrote:

<>

I certainly hope the we’re ready to broaden this discussion list so that it
won’t appear to be exclusively focused on Chinese.

I believe that you are right about the pervasiveness of racial discrimination
even towards Japanese who were not interned – yet, most research has focused
on those who were. You might check Paul R. Spickard’s new book, Japanese
Americans: The Formation and Transformations of an Ethnic Group (New York:
Twayne, 1996). I’ve not yet read it, but I think Spickard talks about
non-interned Japanese Americans. Also, contact Eric Walz, who is doing his
dissertation on Japanese Americans in the Mountain States. His email address
is: ericwalz@imap1.asu.edu

– Tim Tseng

— End —

To: Multiple recipients of list cac
Date: Sun, 2 Mar 1997 20:25:47 -0600 (CST)
From: Samuel Ling
Subject: CAC List Mail: New article to share

–=====================_857363804==_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii”

Dear Friends,
Attached is an article, based on the message I delivered at the Fifth
Chinese Congress on World Evangelization (CCOWE), July 12, 1996 in Hong
Kong. I hope it will appear in CHINESE AROUND THE WORLD. Pardon the length.

Please continue to use Samuel.Ling@Wheaton.edu as my email address until
further notice. THis is an experimental email address, as CHina Horizon is
setting up our web site. DO visit there: http://www.chinahorizon.org.

Sam Ling

— End —

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